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Researchers replicate ice crystal icing formation in aircraft engine

Wed, 02/20/2013 - 9:02am

Assembly of ice crystal formation test in Propulsion Systems Laboratory at NASA's Glenn Research Center, Cleveland. Image: NASAFor the first time ever, researchers are demonstrating ice crystal icing formation in a full-scale engine test facility at NASA's Glenn Research Center.

The tests duplicate the natural events of cloud formation, ingestion by an aircraft engine of ice crystals created by the cloud, and the reduction of engine power that can result. This phenomenon is being studied to gain an understanding of the physics behind ice crystal formation in a turbine engine.

Aircraft today routinely fly around or through areas of deep convection that appear innocuous to pilots, but have at times caused air data system instrument failures, engine power loss, and engine damage due to ice crystal ingestion into the engine. The impact of these events can range from an instrument anomaly, with no impact on the flight, to multi-engine flameout with subsequent restart.

Honeywell Aerospace, of Phoenix, Ariz., provided the engine that served as the test article, and support staff for the tests. "The Honeywell engine we're using for these tests experienced a similar event in the field. Information provided regarding the test engine's field event investigation and resolution is invaluable to the success of these tests," says Mike Olive, lead research engineer at Glenn for the tests.

These one-of-a-kind tests are continuing on a daily basis and will be completed by March 1.

According to Ron Colantonio, Atmospheric Environment Safety Technologies Project Manager at Glenn, "With these tests, NASA is one step closer in accomplishing its goals by recreating a simulated ice crystal environment that has been known to create engine and instrument anomalies during flight in these atmospheric conditions. This capability will increase our understanding of how ice accretes inside an engine and how it affects engine performance and aircraft operability."

No other engine test facility has this capability and the first engine test of this phenomenon is taking place now at Glenn's Propulsion Systems Laboratory.

Glenn is working with industry to address this aviation issue by establishing a capability that will allow engines to be operated at the same temperature and pressure conditions experienced in flight, with ice particles being ingested into full-scale engines to simulate flight through a deep convective cloud.

The information gained through performing these tests will also be used to establish test methods and techniques for the study of engine icing in new and existing commercial engines, and to develop validation data sets required for advanced computer codes that can be specifically applied to assess an engine's susceptibility to icing in terms of its safety, performance, and operability.

Source: NASA Glenn Research Center

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