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How electrodes charge and discharge

April 3, 2014 9:17 am | by David L. Chandler, MIT | Comments

The electrochemical reactions inside the porous electrodes of batteries and fuel cells have been described by theorists, but never measured directly. Now, a team at MIT has figured out a way to measure the fundamental charge transfer rate — finding some significant surprises.

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Fighting cancer with lasers and nanoballoons that pop

April 3, 2014 9:11 am | by University at Buffalo | Comments

Chemotherapeutic drugs excel at fighting cancer, but they're not so efficient at getting where they need to go. Now, researchers are developing a better delivery method by encapsulating the drugs in nanoballoons – which are tiny modified liposomes that, upon being struck by a red laser, pop open and deliver concentrated doses of medicine.

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Researchers provide new insights into quantum dynamics, quantum chaos

April 3, 2014 8:51 am | by Notre Dame University | Comments

A team of researchers has announced analytical prediction and numerical verification of novel quantum rotor states in nanostructured superconductors. The international collaborative team points out that the classical rotor, a macroscopic particle of mass confined to a ring, is one of the most studied systems in classical mechanics.

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Americans used more energy in 2013

April 3, 2014 8:47 am | by Anne M. Stark, LLN | Comments

Americans used more renewable, fossil and even nuclear energy in 2013, according to the most recent energy flow charts released by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory.                                   

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NASA cuts Russian ties, except on ISS

April 3, 2014 8:36 am | by Associated Press, Alicia Chang | Comments

After insisting that space relations wouldn't be altered by earthly politics, NASA announced it was severing ties with Russia except for the International Space Station. NASA employees can't travel to Russia or host visitors until further notice. They're also barred from emailing or holding teleconferences with their Russian counterparts because of Russia's actions in Ukraine, according to a memo sent to workers.

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Discovery could lead to treatments for cancer, common cold

April 2, 2014 12:20 pm | Comments

Scientists have published the first study explaining in detail how viruses reprogram the metabolism of the cells they invade to promote continued viral growth within an organism.                     

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Radiation securely stored in nontoxic molecule

April 2, 2014 12:16 pm | Comments

Researchers have discovered that microscopic "bubbles" are safe and effective storage lockers for harmful isotopes that emit ionizing radiation for treating tumors.                         

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Lab-grown muscle heals itself after animal implantation

April 2, 2014 12:07 pm | Comments

Biomedical engineers have grown living skeletal muscle that looks a lot like the real thing. It contracts powerfully and rapidly, integrates into mice quickly, and for the first time, demonstrates the ability to heal itself both inside the laboratory and inside an animal.

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Building better catalysts for splitting water

April 2, 2014 9:25 am | by Argonne National Laboratory | Comments

The dream of a hydrogen economy — a world run on H2gas, free from the pollution and politics of fossil fuels — may depend on developing an energy-efficient strategy for splitting water into oxygen and hydrogen. The problem is that water bonds are very stable, requiring hefty energy inputs to break. Scientists are eagerly developing catalysts to lower the energy demands, and thus the cost.

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Strain can alter materials’ properties

April 2, 2014 9:18 am | by David Chandler, MIT | Comments

In the ongoing search for new materials for fuel cells, batteries, photovoltaics, separation membranes, and electronic devices, one newer approach involves applying and managing stresses within known materials to give them dramatically different properties. 

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Samsung: Patents developed by Google engineers

April 2, 2014 6:24 am | by Martha Mendoza, AP National Writer | Comments

Samsung fired back at Apple's accusations of patent theft Tuesday, saying the South Korean tech giant didn't write any of the Android software on its smartphones and tablets, Google did. The finger-pointing took place in U.S. District Court in San Jose, where Apple Inc. and Samsung Electronics Co. are accusing each other of stealing ideas from each other. At stake: more than $2 billion if Samsung loses, about $6 million if Apple loses.

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Deep water search for jet could turn on robot subs

April 2, 2014 6:16 am | by Adam Geller, AP National Writer | Comments

If the wreckage of a missing Malaysian airliner rests somewhere in the Indian Ocean's depths, then investigators will likely need to entrust the hunt at least partly to robot submarines and the scientists who deploy them to scan remote swaths of the seafloor. Such unmanned subs played a critical role in locating the carcass of a lost Air France jet in 2011, two years after it crashed in the middle of the south Atlantic.

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Shape helps catalyst extract energy from biomass

April 2, 2014 6:06 am | Comments

Biomass is a good alternative for fossil fuels, but converting biomass into useful chemicals and fuels is difficult in practice. The metal oxide CeO2 can help the process by activating water, but until recent research in the Netherlands, it was not clear in which form the reactivity of this catalyst was highest.

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Good vibrations: Using light-heated water to deliver drugs

April 2, 2014 5:55 am | Comments

Pharmaceutical researchers in California, in collaboration with materials scientists, engineers and neurobiologists, have discovered a new mechanism for using near-infrared light to activate polymeric drug-delivering nanoparticles and other targeted therapeutic substances inside the body. This discovery represents a major innovation; up to now only a handful of strategies using light-triggered release from nanoparticles have been reported.

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Stem cell controversy sets back Japanese science

April 2, 2014 3:21 am | by Elaine Kurtenbach - Associated Press - Associated Press | Comments

The finding that a lead researcher falsified data in a widely heralded stem-cell research paper is a setback for Japan's efforts to promote its advanced research, but also a symptom of the pressure for breakthroughs in the field, experts say. The government-funded Riken Center for Development...

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