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The Lead

3-D Printing Blasts Off, Explodes Into the Future

February 13, 2015 | by Lindsay Hock, Editor | Comments

In 2013, battle lines were drawn. Two stark competitors were looking to speed repairs and cut costs on parts for gas turbines. First to the drawing board was GE, who started using 3-D printing technology at its Global Research Center in Niskayuna, N.Y., to produce more than 85,000 fuel nozzles for its anticipated LEAP engine technology.

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R&D Daily

Laser-Based Ultrasonics

June 5, 2015 4:00 pm | by Manjusha Mehendale, Senior Systems Scientist, Rudolph Technologies Inc., Flanders, N.J. | Comments

The need for improved performance of devices has led to the development of 3-D stacking of chips. Through-silicon via (TSV) has emerged as a viable and preferred technology for achieving such high-performance devices due to its short wiring length and reduced resistance and capacitance (RC) delay. It also offers the most design flexibility, lower manufacturing costs and allows for integration of heterogeneous chips.

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Keeping Cool

June 5, 2015 1:42 pm | by Jeffrey Goldman, Applications Director for Thermo Scientific Laboratory Products, Thermo Fisher Scientific, Waltham, Mass. | Comments

Biobanks play an important role in enabling researchers to develop therapies for chronic diseases. Research institutions, hospitals and pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies have turned to biobanks as a key tool in the research of new treatments and the identification of disease biomarkers from the large cohorts of patients through the collection, storage, inventory, characterization and distribution of valuable samples.

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Maximizing the Value of Scientific Literature

June 4, 2015 1:18 pm | by Jaqui Hodgkinson, VP Product Development, Elsevier | Comments

Reading through the more than one million articles published annually isn’t an option for life sciences researchers that want to keep on top of the constantly growing body of medical literature. That leaves two primary strategies for sifting through the burgeoning literature and extracting meaningful information: manual curation or automated curation.

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Avoid Outdated Methods for Predicting Powder Flow

June 4, 2015 9:46 am | by Robert G. McGregor, General Manager, Global Marketing & High-End Instrument Sales, Brookfield Engineering | Comments

Powder processors are constantly challenging their manufacturing staff to bring new formulations to full-scale production on a relatively short time scale. Pilot plant testing isn’t always possible given marketing pressure to launch products. Therefore, physical test methods used by R&D in the laboratory must accurately predict the “flowability” of the powder before initial startup.

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Monitoring Lab Energy Usage

June 4, 2015 9:21 am | by Chuck McKinney, VP, Strategic Accounts, Aircuity Inc., Newton, Mass. | Comments

Laboratories are notorious for their extraordinary energy consumption, often using six to 10 times the amount of energy of a normal office facility. As more and more attention is given to reduce lab energy use, it becomes increasingly more important to understand the energy drivers in labs to better target energy-conservation measures and improve occupant behaviors.

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Evolving Electron Microscopes Push Even Deeper

June 3, 2015 2:58 pm | by Tim Studt | Comments

Electron microscopy is a multi-scale, multi-modal and multi-dimensional technique for imaging materials down to the atomic level. Developed in 1931 by German physicist Ernst Ruska and electrical engineer Max Knoll, the electron microscope (EM) has evolved from Ruska’s initial 400X capabilities to its current 10,000,000X performance.

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Energy-Efficient Tunnel Ventilation

June 3, 2015 1:16 pm | by Fathi Tarada, Managing Director, Mosen Ltd., U.K. | Comments

Improving the efficiency of turbomachinery, including jet (turbine) fans used in tunnel ventilation systems, is essential in combating the volatile cost of fuel and reducing emissions of greenhouse gases. Energy-efficient equipment is also more attractive to worldwide transportation authorities.

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Essential Instruments for Open-Access Environment

June 2, 2015 3:55 pm | by Russell Scammell,PhD, Group Leader, Physical Chemistry, Charles River Laboratories | Comments

Pharmaceutical companies, like other industries, face frequent and mounting requirements to resolve complex mixtures of active pharmaceutical ingredients into their unique components. Given the demands being placed on medicinal chemistry departments to deliver high-quality new drug candidates, the speed at which separations can be achieved is of utmost importance.

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Things You Need to Know about Digital Oscilloscopes

May 18, 2015 9:42 am | by Lisa Clark, Product & Test Engineer | Comments

Oscilloscopes are a staple for any individual or firm involved with electronics and their functioning due to their versatility. An oscilloscope, also called a scope, is a type of electronic test equipment that allows signal voltages to be viewed, usually as a 2-D graph of one or more electrical potential differences (vertical axis) plotted as a function of time or of some other voltage (horizontal axis).

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Why Drafting Standards Play a Vital Role in Engineering Communication?

April 24, 2015 9:10 am | by Gaurang Trivedi, Engineering Consultant, TrueCADD | Comments

Engineering drawings remain at a core for any manufacturing organization as they communicate ideas that are expected to be transformed into a profitable product. Most companies begin developing engineering drawings using international drafting standards. However, with the course of time, and as the idea begins to shape up, there’s always a deviation from the standards followed.

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Real-Time Process Measurement: A Sea Change in Manufacturing

April 24, 2015 8:44 am | by Chad Lieber, VP of Product Development, Prozess Technologie and Brian Sullivan, Director of Sales, Valin Corp. | Comments

In a world where most information is available in an instant, plant managers and engineers are continuously trying to find ways to improve the efficiency of processes along the manufacturing line. Analyzing these processes can be a difficult task. Until recently, days of laboratory work were often required to analyze any given sample segment or process in a manufacturing line.

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Breaking Down Barriers: Streamlining Data Management to Boost Knowledge Sharing

April 23, 2015 3:10 pm | by Ian Peirson, Senior Solutions Consultant, IDBS | Comments

Research in the pharmaceutical and industrial science industries has become increasingly global, multidisciplinary and data-intensive. This is made clear by the evolution in patent approvals, which can also be considered a reliable measure of innovation in these industries. Innovation itself is a cumulative effect, which requires access to multiple fragments of knowledge from disparate sources and exchange of technology and ideas.

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How Academic Institutions Partner with Private Industry

April 20, 2015 9:41 am | by Janet Corzo, AIA, Associate, Perkins Eastman | Comments

Partnerships between universities and businesses are nothing new, but these partnerships have become especially relevant in the face of increasing economic pressure and global competition, the need for interdisciplinary approaches and the growing complexity of the problems need solutions. In recent years, there has been a resurgence of partnering between academic institutions and private industry.

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Biofuel Struggles with Economics and the Environment

April 17, 2015 2:31 pm | by Tim Studt | Comments

Immediately following the passage of the Energy Independence and Security Act (EISA) of 2007, much research interest focused on the development of bio-based renewable energy sources (biofuels). EISA mandated increased production and use of biofuels for the long term. There also appeared to be substantial long-term government support for the implementation of a biofuel-based industry.

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Lab Utilities Help Promote Science

April 16, 2015 3:47 pm | by Lindsay Hock, Editor | Comments

Compared to industrial and residential construction, labs are expensive as they are highly complex in nature. The end goal to constructing a functional lab is to provide valuable research results. At the heart of a lab is the research conducted and, as a result, lab owners can’t compromise research efforts by overlooking key aspects of the workspace—such as safety, comfort and sustainability.

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