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Creating the fastest outdoor wireless internet connection

December 19, 2014 | Comments

Lancaster University engineers are to head up a European team working on the world’s first W-band wireless system, heralding the arrival of cost effective, high speed internet everywhere, every time.          

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New technique reveals immune cell motion through variety of tissues

December 22, 2014 10:47 am | Comments

Neutrophils, a type of white blood cell, are the immune system’s all-terrain vehicles. The cells are recruited to fight infections or injury in any tissue or organ in the body despite differences in the cellular and biochemical composition. Researchers collaborated to devise a new technique for understanding how neutrophils move in these confined spaces.

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Scientists reveal breakthrough in optical fiber communications

December 22, 2014 10:44 am | Comments

Researchers from the University of Southampton have revealed a breakthrough in optical fiber communications. Academics have collaborated to develop an approach that enables direct modulation of laser currents to be used to generate highly advanced modulation format signals.

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The VuePod: Powerful enough for a gamer, made for an engineer

December 22, 2014 10:37 am | Comments

On the massive screen, images are controlled by a Wii remote that interacts with a Kinnect-like Bluetooth device (called SmartTrack), while 3D glasses worn by the user create dizzying added dimensions. This real-life, computer-powered mega TV is not for gaming. It’s for engineering.

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Possible avenue to better electrolyte for lithium ion batteries

December 22, 2014 10:04 am | Comments

The lithium-ion batteries that mobilize our electronic devices need to be improved if they are to power electric vehicles or store electrical energy for the grid. Berkeley Lab researchers looking for a better understanding of liquid electrolyte may have found a pathway forward.

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Lost memories might be able to be restored

December 22, 2014 10:01 am | Comments

New UCLA research indicates that lost memories can be restored. The findings offer some hope for patients in the early stages of Alzheimer’s disease. For decades, most neuroscientists have believed that memories are stored at the synapsesm which are destroyed by Alzheimer’s disease. The new study provides evidence contradicting the idea that long-term memory is stored at synapses.

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221 new species described in 2014

December 22, 2014 9:58 am | Comments

In 2014, researchers at the California Academy of Sciences added a whopping 221 new plant and animal species to our family tree, enriching our understanding of Earth's complex web of life and strengthening our ability to make informed conservation decisions.

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Poll: Americans skeptical of commercial drones

December 19, 2014 2:36 pm | by Joan Lowy and Jennifer Agiesta - Associated Press | Comments

Americans broadly back tight regulations on commercial drone operators, according to a new Associated Press-GfK poll, as concerns about privacy and safety override the potential benefits of the heralded drone revolution.       

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In one aspect of vision, computers catch up to primate brain

December 19, 2014 2:13 pm | Comments

For decades, neuroscientists have been trying to design computer networks that can mimic visual skills such as recognizing objects, which the human brain does very accurately and quickly.            

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Spider's web weaves way to advanced networks and displays

December 19, 2014 8:26 am | Comments

The next generation of light-manipulating networks may take their lead from designs inspired by spiders and leaves, according to a new report from two Boston College physicists and colleagues at South China Normal University.               

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Research aims to improve rechargeable batteries by focusing on graphene oxide paper

December 19, 2014 8:19 am | Comments

A Kansas State University engineering team has discovered some of graphene oxide's important properties that can improve sodium- and lithium-ion flexible batteries.                               

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Tailor-made cancer treatments? New cell culture technique paves the way

December 19, 2014 8:15 am | Comments

In a development that could lead to a deeper understanding of cancer and better early-stage treatment of the disease, University of Michigan researchers have devised a reliable way to grow a certain type of cancer cells from patients outside the body for study.

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Rice study fuels hope for natural gas cars

December 19, 2014 8:11 am | Comments

Cars that run on natural gas are touted as efficient and environmentally friendly, but getting enough gas onboard to make them practical is a hurdle. A new study led by researchers at Rice University promises to help.                    

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Computational clues into the structure of a promising energy conversion catalyst

December 19, 2014 8:08 am | Comments

Hydrogen fuel is a promising source of clean energy that can be produced by splitting water into hydrogen and oxygen gas. The reaction is difficult but achievable with the help of a catalyst. However, current catalysts lack the efficiency required for water splitting to be commercially competitive. Recently, however, scientists have identified one such catalyst, iron-doped nickel oxide.

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Researchers glimpse pathway of sunlight to electricity

December 19, 2014 8:02 am | Comments

Four pulses of laser light on nanoparticle photocells in a spectroscopy experiment has opened a window on how captured sunlight can be converted into electricity. The work, which potentially could inspire devices with improved efficiency in solar energy conversion, was performed on photocells that used lead-sulfide quantum dots as photoactive semiconductor material. 

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Instant-start computers possible with new breakthrough

December 19, 2014 7:57 am | Comments

A team at Cornell University has made a breakthrough in that direction with a room-temperature magnetoelectric memory device. Equivalent to one computer bit, it exhibits the holy grail of next-generation nonvolatile memory: magnetic switchability, in two steps, with nothing but an electric field.

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