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Genetic testing moves into world of employee health

April 29, 2015 2:07 pm | by Tom Murphy, AP Business Writer, Associated Press | Comments

Your employer may one day help determine if your genes are why your jeans have become too snug. Big companies are considering blending genetic testing with coaching on nutrition and exercise to help workers lose weight and improve their health before serious conditions like diabetes or heart disease develop.

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A dye-doped PNLC cell in the transparent and opaque states, placed on a printed sheet of paper. In the transparent state, the clear background image can be seen because of the high transmittance of this cell. In the opaque state, black color is provided a

Windows that act like an LCD screen

April 29, 2015 2:04 pm | by John Arnst, American Institute of Physics | Comments

The secret desire of urban daydreamers staring out their office windows at the sad brick walls of the building opposite them may soon be answered thanks to transparent light shutters. A novel liquid crystal technology allows displays to flip between transparent and opaque states— hypothetically letting you switch your view in less than a millisecond from urban decay to the Chesapeake Bay.

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The trillion-frame-per-second camera

April 29, 2015 1:58 pm | by The Optical Society | Comments

hen a crystal lattice is excited by a laser pulse, waves of jostling atoms can travel through the material at close to one sixth the speed of light, or approximately 28,000 miles/second. Scientists now have a new tool to take movies of such superfast movement in a single shot.

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NASA's EUNIS sounding rocket examined light from the sun in the area shown by the white line (imposed over an image of the sun from NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory) then separated the light into various wavelengths (as shown in the lined images – spectr

Strong evidence for coronal heating theory presented

April 29, 2015 12:58 pm | by NASA | Comments

The sun's surface is blisteringly hot at 10,340 degrees Fahrenheit—but its atmosphere is another 300 times hotter. This has led to an enduring mystery for those who study the sun: What heats the atmosphere to such extreme temperatures? Normally when you move away from a hot source the environment gets cooler, but some mechanism is clearly at work in the solar atmosphere, the corona, to bring the temperatures up so high.

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Fine details of a magnetic flux rope captured by the New Solar Telescope at Big Bear Solar Observatory for Solar Active Region 11817 on 2013 August 11. The structure is further demonstrated by the 3-D magnetic modeling based the observations of Helioseism

Observatory captures groundbreaking images of flaring solar flux ropes

April 29, 2015 12:53 pm | by New Jersey Institute of Technology | Comments

Scientists at NJIT’s Big Bear Solar Observatory (BBSO) have captured the first high-resolution images of the flaring magnetic structures known as solar flux ropes at their point of origin in the Sun’s chromosphere. Their research, published in Nature Communications, provides new insights into the massive eruptions on the Sun’s surface responsible for space weather.

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Analysis of multifractals, conducted by the Institute of Nuclear Physics of the Polish Academy of Sciences in Kraków, Poland, suggest the existence of an unknown mechanism on the Sun, influenced by changes in the number of sunspots. Graphs on multifractal

Multifractals suggest the existence of an unknown physical mechanism on the Sun

April 29, 2015 12:49 pm | by The Henryk Niewodniczanski Institute of Nuclear Physics Polish Academy of Sciences | Comments

The famous sunspots on the surface of the Earth's star result from the dynamics of strong magnetic fields, and their numbers are an important indicator of the state of activity on the Sun. Researchers have been conducting multifractal analysis into the changes in the numbers of sunspots. The resulting graphs were surprisingly asymmetrical in shape, suggesting that sunspots may be involved in hitherto unknown physical processes.

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A phone with the ultimate macro feature

April 29, 2015 12:45 pm | by The Optical Society | Comments

If you thought scanning one of those strange, square QR codes with your phone was somewhat advanced, hold on to your seat. Researchers at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) have recently developed a device that can turn any smartphone into a DNA-scanning fluorescent microscope. 

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1st proton collisions at the world’s largest science experiment expected to start in early June

April 29, 2015 12:42 pm | by Margaret Allen, Southern Methodist University | Comments

First collisions of protons at the world’s largest science experiment are expected to start the first or second week of June, according to a senior research scientist with CERN’s Large Hadron Collider in Geneva. The LHC in early April was restarted for its second three-year run after a two-year pause to upgrade the machine to operate at higher energies.

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Apparatus measures single electron’s radiation to try to weigh a neutrino

April 29, 2015 11:41 am | by University of Washington | Comments

University of Washington physicists are part of a team that made a step forward in their efforts to pin down the mass of a neutrino, an elusive subatomic particle that played a role in the formation of the universe.

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Robotically discovering Earth's nearest neighbors

April 29, 2015 11:34 am | by University of Hawaii at Manoa | Comments

A team of astronomers using ground-based telescopes in Hawaii, California, and Arizona recently discovered a planetary system orbiting a nearby star that is only 54 light-years away. All three planets orbit their star at a distance closer than Mercury orbits the sun, completing their orbits in just 5, 15, and 24 days.

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Chirping electrons: Cyclotron radiation from single electrons measured directly for first time

April 29, 2015 11:26 am | by PNNL | Comments

A year before Albert Einstein came up with the special theory of relativity, or E=mc2, physicists predicted the existence of something else: cyclotron radiation. Scientists predicted this radiation to be given off by electrons whirling around in a circle while trapped in a magnetic field. Over the last century, scientists have observed this radiation from large ensembles of electrons but never from individual ones. Until now.

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Enron becomes unlikely data source for computer science researchers

April 29, 2015 11:23 am | by NC State University | Comments

Computer science researchers have turned to unlikely sources - including Enron - for assembling huge collections of spreadsheets that can be used to study how people use this software. The goal is for the data to facilitate research to make spreadsheets more useful.

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Chromosome-folding theory shows promise

April 29, 2015 11:20 am | by Rice University | Comments

Human chromosomes are much bigger and more complex than proteins, but like proteins, they appear to fold and unfold in an orderly process as they carry out their functions in cells. Rice University biophysicist Peter Wolynes and postdoctoral fellow Bin Zhang have embarked upon a long project to define that order. 

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Making robots more human

April 29, 2015 11:17 am | by ACS | Comments

Most people are naturally adept at reading facial expressions — from smiling and frowning to brow-furrowing and eye-rolling — to tell what others are feeling. Now scientists have developed ultra-sensitive, wearable sensors that can do the same thing.

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Artificial photosynthesis could help make fuels, plastics and medicine

April 29, 2015 11:13 am | by ACS | Comments

The global industrial sector accounts for more than half of the total energy used every year. Now scientists are inventing a new artificial photosynthetic system that could one day reduce industry’s dependence on fossil fuel-derived energy by powering part of the sector with solar energy and bacteria.

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