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The countdown is on! Final R&D 100 deadline: May 9, 2014

April 18, 2014 8:52 am | News | Comments

In response to interest from potential competitors we have made one final extension to the 2014 R&D 100 Awards Entry Deadline: May 9. That gives anyone with a new product three more weeks to prepare their entry. It is certainly time enough to prepare a new entry as well. Remember, a new product launched at any time in the calendar year 2013, it can be considered for the Awards.

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R&D Daily

Cell resiliency surprises scientists

April 24, 2014 4:22 pm | by Anzar Abbas, Michigan State Univ. | News | Comments

New research shows that cells are more resilient in taking care of their DNA than scientists originally thought. Even when missing critical components, cells can adapt and make copies of their DNA in an alternative way. A team of researchers at Michigan State Univ. have shown in a study that cells can grow normally without a crucial component needed to duplicate their DNA.

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Scientists find new point of attack on HIV for vaccine development

April 24, 2014 12:45 pm | News | Comments

A team led by scientists at The Scripps Research Institute working with the International AIDS Vaccine Initiative has discovered a new vulnerable site on the HIV virus. The newly identified site can be attacked by human antibodies in a way that neutralizes the infectivity of a wide variety of HIV strains.

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Animal study suggests some astronauts are at risk for cognitive impairment

April 24, 2014 11:57 am | News | Comments

Johns Hopkins Univ. scientists report that rats exposed to high-energy particles, simulating conditions astronauts would face on a long-term deep space mission, show lapses in attention and slower reaction times, even when the radiation exposure is in extremely low dose ranges.

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Double-duty electrolyte enables new chemistry for longer-lived batteries

April 24, 2014 11:44 am | by Morgan McCorkle, Oak Ridge National Laboratory | News | Comments

Researchers at Oak Ridge National Laboratory have developed a new and unconventional battery chemistry aimed at producing batteries that last longer than previously thought possible. In a study published in the Journal of the American Chemical Society, ORNL researchers challenged a long-held assumption that a battery’s three main components can play only one role in the device.

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Did you know? More than 100 universities have won R&D 100 Awards

April 24, 2014 9:33 am | by Paul Livingstone, Senior Editor | News | Comments

The R&D 100 Awards recognizes the best in industrial technology and research, but not all our winners are corporations. Many award-winning technologies emerge from college, universities, institutions and non-profit research organizations. Academic laboratories have in recent years enhanced their ability to generate innovative products, and winning entries are an increasingly common sight, more than three dozen in the past 10 years.

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Programmable HPLC Column Chiller/Heater

April 24, 2014 9:32 am | Product Releases | Comments

Torrey Pines Scientific has introduced its EchoTherm Model CO50 programmable HPLC column chiller/heater. The CO50 has a temperature range from 4 C to 00 C readable and settable to .1 C. The PID control software regulates temperatures to about .2 C, even at ambient.

Multicapacity Microreactor for Catalyst Characterization

April 24, 2014 9:28 am | Hiden Analytical, Inc. | Product Releases | Comments

Hiden Analytical’s CATLAB integrated microreactor/mass spectrometer (MS) system now addresses an extended applications range with the introduction of enlarged sample capacity options to accommodate sample volumes up to 2 mL. The system monitors gas and vapor reaction products directly from the sample position via the primary sampling interface embedded within the 1,000 C fast-response furnace.

Probing the sound of a quantum dot

April 24, 2014 8:23 am | by Verity Leatherdale, Univ. of Sydney | News | Comments

Physicists at the Univ. of Sydney have discovered a method of using microwaves to probe the sounds of a quantum dot, a promising platform for building a quantum computer. A quantum dot consists of a small number of electrons trapped in zero dimensions inside a solid.

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New ultrasound device may add in detecting risk for heart attack, stroke

April 24, 2014 8:16 am | by Matt Shipman, News Services, North Carolina State Univ. | News | Comments

Researchers have developed an ultrasound device that could help identify arterial plaque that is at high risk of breaking off and causing heart attack or stroke. At issue is the plaque that builds up in arteries as we age. Some types of plaque are deemed “vulnerable,” meaning that they are more likely to detach from the artery wall and cause heart attack or stroke.

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Chameleon crystals could make active camouflage possible

April 24, 2014 8:04 am | by Kate McAlpine, Univ. of Michigan | News | Comments

The ability to control crystals with light and chemistry could lead to chameleon-style color-changing camouflage for vehicle bodies and other surfaces. Univ. of Michigan researchers discovered a template-free method for growing shaped crystals that allows for changeable structures that could appear as different colors and patterns.

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Atomic switcheroo explains origins of thin-film solar cell mystery

April 24, 2014 7:55 am | by Morgan McCorkle, Oak Ridge National Laboratory | News | Comments

Treating cadmium-telluride (CdTe) solar cell materials with cadmium-chloride improves their efficiency, but researchers have not fully understood why. Now, an atomic-scale examination of the thin-film solar cells led by Oak Ridge National Laboratory has answered this decades-long debate about the materials’ photovoltaic efficiency increase after treatment.

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Superconducting qubit array points the way to quantum computers

April 24, 2014 7:46 am | by Julie Cohen, Univ. of California, Santa Barbara | News | Comments

A fully functional quantum computer is one of the holy grails of physics. Unlike conventional computers, the quantum version uses qubits (quantum bits), which make direct use of the multiple states of quantum phenomena. When realized, a quantum computer will be millions of times more powerful at certain computations than today’s supercomputers.

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Study: Gene therapy may boost cochlear implants

April 24, 2014 7:45 am | by Lauran Neergaard, AP Medical Writer | News | Comments

Australian researchers are trying a novel way to boost the power of cochlear implants: They used the technology to beam gene therapy into the ears of deaf animals and found the combination improved hearing. The approach reported Wednesday isn't ready for human testing, but it's part of growing research into ways to let users of cochlear implants experience richer, more normal sound.

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When things get glassy, molecules go fractal

April 24, 2014 7:36 am | News | Comments

Combining theory and numerical simulations, researchers have resolved an enduring question in the theory of glasses by showing that their energy landscapes are far rougher than previously believed. The new model, which shows that molecules in glassy materials settle into a fractal hierarchy of states, unites mathematics, theory and several formerly disparate properties of glasses.

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U.K.’s lead in physics healthy, but insecure

April 23, 2014 11:36 am | News | Comments

Newly published research shows that, when the quality of the U.K.’s scientific output is compared with that of its leading international competitor nations, the U.K.’s lead in physics comes despite a lack of investment relative to other scientific disciplines, such as the life sciences.

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