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Flight is Greener than Driving

April 27, 2015 | by Univ. of Michigan | News | Comments

Flying in a plane is not only safer than driving a car, it's also better for the environment. In follow-up research from last year, a study found that it takes twice as much energy to drive than to fly.

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3-D Method Aids Study of Proteins

April 27, 2015 11:08 am | by Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona | News | Comments

Researchers have developed AGGRESCAN3D, a new computational method which allows studying the structure of folded globular proteins and their propensity for forming toxic protein aggregates.

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Coral-inhabiting Gall Crab Species Discovered

April 27, 2015 11:00 am | by Pensoft Publishers | News | Comments

Fieldwork in Indonesia and Malaysia lead to the discovery of a new coral-dwelling gall crab. The new gall crab, named Lithoscaptus semperi, was discovered inhabiting free-living corals of the species Trachyphyllia geoffroyi on sandy bottoms near coral reefs.

Device Weighs, Images Individual Molecules

April 27, 2015 10:43 am | by Caltech | News | Comments

Building on their creation of the first-ever mechanical device that can measure the mass of individual molecules, one at a time, a team of scientists have created nanodevices that can also reveal their shape. Such information is crucial when trying to identify large protein molecules or complex assemblies of protein molecules.

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Research Reveals Structures of Gold Nanoparticles

April 27, 2015 10:31 am | by Univ. of Nebraska–Lincoln | News | Comments

They may deal in gold, atomic staples and electron volts rather than cement, support beams and kilowatt-hours, but chemists have drafted new nanoscale blueprints for low-energy structures capable of housing pharmaceuticals and oxygen atoms. New research has revealed four atomic arrangements of a gold nanoparticle cluster.

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In-line Holography Sheds Light on Fiery Fuels

April 27, 2015 10:11 am | by Sandia National Laboratories | News | Comments

Transportation accidents, such as trucks crashing on a highway or rockets failing on a launch pad, can create catastrophic fires. It’s important to understand how burning droplets of fuel are generated and behave in those extreme cases, so researchers have developed 3-D measurement techniques based on digital in-line holography.

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Power Outages Limit Tech’s Ability to Help People Connect After Quake

April 27, 2015 10:06 am | by Associated Press, Foster Klug | News | Comments

Power outages and communications problems have made life agonizing for the nearly 6 million Nepalese who live abroad— or about 22 percent of the population. They try desperately to reach loved ones through cellphones and global messaging apps, only to be met with silence or fleeting connections. The impoverished country’s communications have been shaken back to a different era.

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Daniel Wilson Ph.D. researcher with UAV and drogue

Sky-high refuelling for UAVs

April 24, 2015 11:13 am | by Univ. of Sydney | News | Comments

A Univ. of Sydney researcher has designed and successfully tested a method for autonomously docking drones for refueling or recharging, in mid-air. He used a combination of precise measurements from an infrared camera, with GPS and inertial sensors to allow the sky-high docking to occur.

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JILA's strontium lattice atomic clock now performs better than ever because scientists literally "take the temperature" of the atoms' environment. Two specialized thermometers, calibrated by NIST researchers and visible in the center of the photo, are ins

Getting better all the time: JILA strontium atomic clock sets new records

April 24, 2015 10:57 am | by NIST | News | Comments

In another advance at the far frontiers of timekeeping by NIST researchers, the latest modification of a record-setting strontium atomic clock has achieved precision and stability levels that now mean the clock would neither gain nor lose one second in some 15 billion years—roughly the age of the universe.

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A team of researchers using the Advanced Photon Source, above, a U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science User Facility at Argonne National Laboratory, demonstrated unparalleled sensitivity for measuring the distribution of trace elements in thicker sp

X-ray ptychography, fluorescence microscopy combo sheds new light on trace elements

April 24, 2015 10:44 am | by Angela Hardin, Argonne National Laboratory | News | Comments

Scientists have developed a new approach that combines ptychographic x-ray imaging and fluorescence microscopy to study the important role trace elements play in biological functions on hydrated cells. A team of researchers using the Advanced Photon Source demonstrated unparalleled sensitivity for measuring distribution of trace elements in thicker specimens at cryogenic temperatures, in this case at about 260 degrees below Fahrenheit.

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The ‘gate sensor’ is so accurate that it can detect the charge of a single electron in less than one microsecond.

Ultra-sensitive sensor detects individual electrons

April 24, 2015 10:25 am | by SINC | News | Comments

A Spanish-led team of European researchers at the Univ. of Cambridge has created an electronic device so accurate that it can detect the charge of a single electron in less than one microsecond. It has been dubbed the "gate sensor" and could be applied in quantum computers of the future to read information stored in the charge or spin of a single electron.

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A tetrahedron is a polyhedron composed of four triangular faces, three of which meet at each corner or vertex. It has six edges and four vertices.

Revolutionary discovery leads to invention of new "building blocks"

April 24, 2015 10:16 am | by Univ. of Akron | News | Comments

Macromolecular science will have to add a new giant molecule to its lexicon thanks to new and cutting-edge polymer research at The Univ. of Akron (UA). The research team led by Stephen Z.D. Cheng, professor at UA’s college of polymer science and polymer engineering, invented a new thinking pathway in the design and synthesis of macromolecules—the backbone of modern polymers—by creating an original class of giant tetrahedra.

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James Webb Space Telescope's Pathfinder backplane test model is being prepared for its cryogenic test. Courtesy of NASA/Chris Gunn

Building Hubble's successor: Crucial Pathfinder test set up inside Chamber A

April 24, 2015 10:05 am | by Laura Betz, NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center | News | Comments

Inside NASA's giant thermal vacuum chamber, called Chamber A, at NASA's Johnson Space Center in Houston, the James Webb Space Telescope's Pathfinder backplane test model is being prepared for its cryogenic test. Previously used for manned spaceflight missions, this historic chamber is now filled with engineers and technicians preparing for a crucial test.

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Heat makes electrons’ spin in magnetic superconductors

April 24, 2015 9:53 am | by Academy of Finland | News | Comments

Physicists have shown how heat can be exploited for controlling magnetic properties of matter. The finding helps in the development of more efficient mass memories. The result was published in Physical Review Letters. The international research group behind the breakthrough included Finnish researchers from the University of Jyväskylä and Aalto Univ.

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Why Drafting Standards Play a Vital Role in Engineering Communication?

April 24, 2015 9:10 am | by Gaurang Trivedi, Engineering Consultant, TrueCADD | Articles | Comments

Engineering drawings remain at a core for any manufacturing organization as they communicate ideas that are expected to be transformed into a profitable product. Most companies begin developing engineering drawings using international drafting standards. However, with the course of time, and as the idea begins to shape up, there’s always a deviation from the standards followed.

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Real-Time Process Measurement: A Sea Change in Manufacturing

April 24, 2015 8:44 am | by Chad Lieber, VP of Product Development, Prozess Technologies and Brian Sullivan, Director of Sales, Valin Corp. | Articles | Comments

In a world where most information is available in an instant, plant managers and engineers are continuously trying to find ways to improve the efficiency of processes along the manufacturing line. Analyzing these processes can be a difficult task. Until recently, days of laboratory work were often required to analyze any given sample segment or process in a manufacturing line.

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