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Crystallizing the DNA nanotechnology dream

October 20, 2014 | by Kat J. McAlpine, Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering | News | Comments

DNA has garnered attention for its potential as a programmable material platform that could spawn entire new and revolutionary nanodevices in computer science, microscopy, biology and more. Researchers have been working to master the ability to coax DNA molecules to self-assemble into the precise shapes and sizes needed in order to fully realize these nanotechnology dreams.

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Atomic trigger shatters mystery of how glass deforms

October 20, 2014 11:04 am | News | Comments

Research at Oak Ridge National Laboratory has cracked one mystery of glass to shed light on the mechanism that triggers its deformation before shattering. The study improves understanding of glassy deformation and may accelerate broader application of metallic glass, a moldable, wear-resistant, magnetically exploitable material that is thrice as strong as the mightiest steel and ten times as springy.

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Multispectral Imaging Camera

October 20, 2014 10:40 am | Product Releases | Comments

Teledyne DALSA has introduced its Piranha4 2k quadlinear line scan camera featuring red, green and blue (RGB) outputs plus a near-infrared (NIR) channel for multispectral imaging. The quadlinear Piranha4 is built around Teledyne DALSA’s advanced CMOS image sensor design. Wafer-level dichroic filters enable spectrally independent RGB and NIR outputs, enhancing detection capability for a wide range of machine vision applications, including print, bank note inspection, electronics manufacturing, food and material sorting.

Imaging electric charge propagating along microbial nanowires

October 20, 2014 10:37 am | News | Comments

The claim by microbiologist Derek Lovley and colleagues at the Univ. of Massachusetts Amherst that the microbe Geobacter produces tiny electrical wires, called microbial nanowires, has been mired in controversy for a decade, but the researchers say a new collaborative study provides stronger evidence than ever to support their claims. Their finding involves a new imaging technique, electrostatic force microscopy.

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Syringe Drive for Precise Liquid Handling

October 20, 2014 10:31 am | Product Releases | Comments

Hamilton’s Laboratory and Sensors Div. has introduced the Hamilton Precision Syringe Drive 6 (PSD/6); a compact, full-height pump for precision dispensing of small to large volumes. The Hamilton PSD/6 is the newest full-height syringe pump to join the Hamilton PSD family, and performs all standard liquid handling functions including dispensing, serial dispensing and diluting.

EU seeking to create $1.27 billion Ebola fund

October 20, 2014 10:27 am | by Raf Casert - Associated Press - Associated Press | News | Comments

European Union nations are working to reach 1 billion euros ($1.27 billion) in aid by the end of the week to fight Ebola in West Africa and are seeking a common approach to the crisis.EU foreign ministers began a week of talks Monday so their 28 leaders can agree by Friday on better measures to fight Ebola, anything from financial aid to common repatriation procedures, more Ebola treatment facilities and better training for health workers.

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Solutions in Search of Problems: Spectroscopy Takes Flight

October 20, 2014 10:07 am | by Yvette Mattley, PhD, Senior Applications Specialist and Rob Morris, Marketing Operations Manager, Ocean Optics | Ocean Optics | Articles | Comments

Spectral sensing is so pervasive that most take it for granted. Even miniature spectrometers have been embraced by late adopters. Yet, spectroscopy has moved beyond routine laboratory and test measurements to take on ever-more sophisticated applications. In this article we explore how familiar spectral sensing technologies—and new ways to exploit them—are today addressing a wider range of measurement problems than ever.

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“Mega” cells control the growth of blood-producing cells

October 20, 2014 9:38 am | News | Comments

While megakaryocytes are best known for producing platelets that heal wounds, these "mega" cells found in bone marrow also play a critical role in regulating stem cells according to new research from the Stowers Institute for Medical Research. The study is the first to show that hematopoietic stem cells (the parent cells) can be directly controlled by their own progeny (megakaryocytes).

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Goldilocks principle wrong for particle assembly

October 20, 2014 9:32 am | by New York Univ. | News | Comments

Microscopic particles that bind under low temperatures will melt as temperatures rise to moderate levels, but re-connect under hotter conditions, a team of New York Univ. scientists has found. Their discovery points to new ways to create "smart materials," cutting-edge materials that adapt to their environment by taking new forms, and to sharpen the detail of 3-D printing.

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R&D 100 Award Video: Calcium Loop for Carbon Capture

October 20, 2014 9:07 am | by Lindsay Hock, Managing Editor | Videos | Comments

Carbon capture and sequestration isn’t only suitable for new power plants, but more essential in retrofitting existing ones. Because of this retrofitting nature, carbon capture and sequestration is regarded by the International Energy Agency as the single technology most capable of carbon dioxide reduction in the world and could account for more than 20% of global carbon dioxide abatement by 2050.

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IBM to pay $1.5 billion to shed its costly chip division

October 20, 2014 8:58 am | by Michelle Chapman, AP Business Writer | News | Comments

IBM will pay $1.5 billion to Globalfoundries in order to shed its costly chip division.  According to IBM Director of Research John E. Kelly III in an interview Monday, handing over control of the semiconductor operations will allow it to grow faster, while IBM continues to invest in and expand its chip research. Privately held Globalfoundries will get IBM's global commercial semiconductor technology business.

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Protons hog the momentum in neutron-rich nuclei

October 20, 2014 8:36 am | by Jared Sagoff, Argonne National Laboratory | News | Comments

Like dancers swirling on the dance floor with bystanders looking on, protons and neutrons that have briefly paired up in the nucleus have higher-average momentum, leaving less for non-paired nucleons. Using data from nuclear physics experiments, researchers have now shown for the first time that this phenomenon exists in nuclei heavier than carbon, including aluminum, iron and lead.

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A 3-D map of the adolescent universe

October 20, 2014 8:18 am | by Kate Greene, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory | News | Comments

Using extremely faint light from galaxies 10.8-billion light-years away, scientists have created one of the most complete, 3-D maps of a slice of the adolescent universe. The map shows a web of hydrogen gas that varies from low to high density at a time when the universe was made of a fraction of the dark matter we see today.

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Energy storage of the future

October 20, 2014 7:55 am | by Anne M. Stark, Lawrence Livermore National Laboraotry | News | Comments

Personal electronics such as cell phones and laptops could get a boost from some of the lightest materials in the world. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory researchers have turned to graphene aerogel for enhanced electrical energy storage that eventually could be used to smooth out power fluctuations in the energy grid.

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Ebola fear, monitoring eases for some in Dallas

October 20, 2014 1:26 am | by Marilynn Marchione - Associated Press - Associated Press | News | Comments

Ebola fears began to ease for some Monday as a monitoring period passed for those who had close contact with a victim of the disease and after a cruise ship scare ended with the boat returning to port and a laboratory worker on board testing negative for the virus. Federal officials meanwhile ramped up readiness to deal with future cases.

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Software for Super-resolution Microscopy

October 17, 2014 2:01 pm | Product Releases | Comments

Researchers using microscopy for cell and tissue imaging can now obtain optical resolution of up to 120 nm, thanks to a novel software upgrade from Olympus. With Olympus FV-OSR software, the FluoView FV1200 confocal laser scanning microscope is transformed into a powerful system for super-resolution microscopy.  

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