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Programmable Hot Plate

March 17, 2015 10:31 am | by Torrey Pines Scientific | Product Releases | Comments

Torrey Pines Scientific Inc. has introduced its EchoTherm Model HP61A Programmable Hot Plate with a 12-in-by-12-in milled-flat cast aluminum heater top. Applications include wafer processing and annealing, polymer engineering, baking photo resists, wax and glue heating and bonding, micro fabrication and encapsulation, surface mount soldering and heating any sample directly on the heater surface.

Researchers collaborate to develop revolutionary 3D printing technology

March 17, 2015 10:30 am | by Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill | Videos | Comments

A 3D printing technology developed by Silicon Valley startup, Carbon3D Inc., enables objects to rise from a liquid media continuously rather than being built layer-by-layer as they have been for the past 25 years, representing a fundamentally new approach to 3D printing. The technology allows ready-to-use products to be made 25 to 100 times faster than other methods.

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Nanospheres cooled with light to explore the limits of quantum physics

March 17, 2015 10:19 am | by Univ. College London | News | Comments

A team of scientists at Univ. College London has developed a new technology which could one day create quantum phenomena in objects far larger than any achieved so far. The team successfully suspended glass particles 400 nm across in a vacuum using an electric field, then used lasers to cool them to within a few degrees of absolute zero. These are the key prerequisites for making an object behave according to quantum principles.

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Process Enclosures

March 17, 2015 9:35 am | by Fluid Metering Inc. | Product Releases | Comments

Flow Sciences' Process Enclosures are designed and customized to protect the process equipment and the personnel. The EVP Series provides safety from chemical vapors generated during processes such as flash chromatography, evaporation from rotary evaporators and other process equipment applications. The Process Enclosure Series was developed for vapors to be removed from the application and the laboratory.

Filtration Revealed Through Tests of Precision

March 17, 2015 9:29 am | by Chandreyee Das, PhD, Sample Preparation and Protein Detection, EMD Millipore | Articles | Comments

Repeatability underlies a researcher’s ability to control variation and increase sensitivity in an experiment. For sensitive analyses, such as cell-based assays, mass spectrometry and high-resolution protein structure determination, precise repeatability requires careful factorial design of experiments by systematically varying experimental parameters.

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Opening a window on quantum gravity

March 17, 2015 9:11 am | by Yale Univ. | News | Comments

Yale Univ. has received a grant from the W. M. Keck Foundation to fund experiments that researchers hope will provide new insights into quantum gravity. Jack Harris, associate professor of physics, will lead a Yale team that aims to address a long-standing question in physics: how the classical behavior of macroscopic objects emerges from microscopic constituents that obey the laws of quantum mechanics.

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Additive manufacturing could greatly improve diabetes management

March 17, 2015 8:55 am | by David Stauth, Oregon State Univ. | News | Comments

Engineers at Oregon State Univ. have used additive manufacturing to create an improved type of glucose sensor for patients with Type 1diabetes, part of a system that should work better, cost less and be more comfortable for the patient. A key advance is use of electrohydrodynamic jet, or “e-jet” printing, to make the sensor.

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Clean energy future

March 17, 2015 8:16 am | by Deborah Smith, Univ. of New South Wales | News | Comments

Univ. of New South Wales Australia scientists have developed a highly efficient oxygen-producing electrode for splitting water that has the potential to be scaled up for industrial production of the clean energy fuel, hydrogen. The new technology is based on an inexpensive, specially coated foam material that lets the bubbles of oxygen escape quickly.

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New trigger of cellular self-destruction identified

March 17, 2015 8:03 am | by Elizabeth Gardner, Purdue Univ. | News | Comments

Researchers have identified a bacterial protein that triggers a self-inflicted cell death pathway in immune system cells and could lead to a better understanding of an important cellular structure. The protein initiates a cascade of events that leads the lysosome to open holes in its membrane and release enzymes that destroy the cell.

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A better way to study the stomach flu

March 17, 2015 7:52 am | by Jade Boyd, Rice Univ. | News | Comments

Rice Univ. bioengineers are teaming with colleagues from Baylor College of Medicine and MD Anderson Cancer Center to apply the latest techniques in tissue engineering toward the study of one of the most common and deadly human illnesses: the stomach flu. The bacteria and viruses that cause acute gastroenteritis often come from contaminated food or water and result in cramps, nausea, diarrhea and vomiting.

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Second minor planet may possess Saturn-like rings

March 17, 2015 7:43 am | by Jennifer Chu, MIT News Office | News | Comments

There are only five bodies in our solar system that are known to bear rings. The most obvious is the planet Saturn; to a lesser extent, rings of gas and dust also encircle Jupiter, Uranus and Neptune. The fifth member of this haloed group is Chariklo, one of a class of minor planets called centaurs: small, rocky bodies that possess qualities of both asteroids and comets.

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Circular Polarization Spectroscopy of Microscopic Samples

March 16, 2015 8:34 pm | by CRAIC Technologies | CRAIC Technologies | Product Releases | Comments

CRAIC Technologies has introduced the addition of circular polarization spectroscopy capabilities to CRAIC microspectrophotometers. This unique feature is offered as packages that allow users to measure the circular polarization spectra in either transmission or reflectance modes. The ability to measure circular polarization microspectra represents a powerful new tool for both materials science and biological research.

Supercomputers help solve puzzle-like bond for biofuels

March 16, 2015 4:25 pm | by Jorge Salazar, TACC | News | Comments

One of life's strongest bonds has been discovered by a science team researching biofuels with the help of supercomputers. Their find could boost efforts to develop catalysts for biofuel production from non-food waste plants.

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Consistency: The key to success in bread baking, biology

March 16, 2015 4:08 pm | by Jim Erickson, Univ. of Michigan | News | Comments

Whether you're baking bread or building an organism, the key to success is consistently adding ingredients in the correct order and in the right amounts, according to a new genetic study by Univ. of Michigan researchers. Using the baker's yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the team developed a novel way to disentangle the effects of random genetic mutations and natural selection on the evolution of gene expression.

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East Antarctica melting could be explained by oceanic gateways

March 16, 2015 3:46 pm | by Monica Kortsha, Univ. of Texas at Austin | News | Comments

Researchers at The Univ. of Texas at Austin have discovered two seafloor gateways that could allow warm ocean water to reach the base of Totten Glacier, East Antarctica’s largest and most rapidly thinning glacier. The discovery probably explains the glacier’s extreme thinning and raises concerns about how it will affect sea level rise.

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