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Corn Fears No Drought

August 20, 2014 1:57 pm | Award Winners

According to the U.S. Drought Monitor, many states across the U.S. currently display drought conditions ranging from severe to exceptional, including regions in the Western Great Plains. In 2013, corn farmers in these areas were able to plant deeper roots and produce strong yields with Monsanto’s Genuity DroughtGard Hybrids.

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Cleaning Up Catastrophic Messes

August 20, 2014 1:50 pm | Award Winners

Hitachi Research Laboratory and Hitachi-GE Nuclear Energy Ltd joined together to develop the Hitachi Cs-Sr simultaneous adsorbent to treat radionuclide-contaminated water being stored at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station. This adsorbent is the first of its kind that can simultaneously adsorb radioactive cesium (Cs) and radioactive strontium (Sr) dissolved in water at a high adsorption rate of 99% or better, satisfying the standards for drinking water established by the Japanese Ministry of Health, Labor and Welfare (radiation dose of 10 Bq/L or less) using half the quantity of conventional adsorbents.

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Clean Water for All

August 20, 2014 12:09 pm | Award Winners

Clean Filtration Technologies LLC, a subsidiary of The Dow Chemical Company, has developed the TEQUATIC PLUS fine particle filter. The filter is a disruptive technology that unlike conventional filters can clean itself. Constant fouling and plugging are things of the past, replaced by high uptime and low maintenance.

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Could elastic bands monitor patients’ breathing?

August 20, 2014 11:39 am | News | Comments

Research published in ACS Nano identifies a new type of sensor that could monitor body movement and advance the future of global health care. Although body motion sensors already exist in different forms, they have not been widely used due to their complexity and cost of production.

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Many patients don’t understand electronic lab results

August 20, 2014 10:48 am | by Laurel Thomas Gnagey, Univ. of Michigan | News | Comments

While it's becoming commonplace for patients to see the results of laboratory work electronically, a new Univ. of Michigan study suggests that many people may not be able to understand what those numbers mean. The research found that people with low comprehension of numerical concepts—or numeracy—and low literacy skills were less than half as likely to understand whether a result was inside or outside the reference ranges.

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Research paves way for development of cyborg moth “biobots”

August 20, 2014 9:46 am | by Matt Shipman, News Services, North Carolina State Univ. | News | Comments

North Carolina State Univ. researchers have developed methods for electronically manipulating the flight muscles of moths and for monitoring the electrical signals moths use to control those muscles. The work opens the door to the development of remotely-controlled moths, or “biobots,” for use in emergency response.

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Researchers create engineered energy-absorbing material

August 20, 2014 9:36 am | by James A Bono, LLNL | News | Comments

Materials like solid gels and porous foams are used for padding and cushioning, but each has its own advantages and limitations. To overcome limitations, a team from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory has found a way to design and fabricate, at the microscale, new cushioning materials with a broad range of programmable properties and behaviors that exceed the limitations of the material's composition through 3-D printing.

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Exporting coal to Asia could slash emissions

August 20, 2014 9:26 am | by Tim Lucas, Duke Univ. | News | Comments

Under the right scenario, exporting U.S. coal to power plants in South Korea could lead to a 21% drop in greenhouse gas emissions compared to burning the fossil fuel at plants in the U.S., according to a new Duke Univ.-led study. For the reduction to occur, U.S. plants would need to replace the exported coal with natural gas. And in South Korea, the imported coal must replace other coal as the power source.

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Manual Inflating Sample Bag

August 20, 2014 9:16 am | Product Releases | Comments

New Star Environmental has introduced the VeriAir Flex manual inflating sample bag. The VeriAir Flex is suitable for emergency response situations, where an atmospheric air sample can be collected in a hot zone and then moved to a safe zone to be tested with a portable gas chromatograph or other analytical instrument.

High-temperature Ultra Nanoindentation Tester

August 20, 2014 9:11 am | Product Releases | Comments

Based on Anton Paar’s Ultra Nanoindentation Tester, the High-Temperature Ultra Nanoindentation Tester offers high resolution and thermal stability. Active surface referencing technology reduces thermal drift (10 nm/min at 400 C) and the unique materials design allows for negligible thermal expansion.

Engineers take step toward photonic circuits

August 20, 2014 8:35 am | by Richard Cairney, Univ. of Alberta | News | Comments

The invention of fiber optics revolutionized the way we share information, allowing us to transmit data at volumes and speeds we’d only previously dreamed of. Now, electrical engineering researchers at the Univ. of Alberta are breaking another barrier, designing nano-optical cables small enough to replace the copper wiring on computer chips.

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Bubbling down: Discovery suggests surprising uses for common bubbles

August 20, 2014 8:29 am | by John Sullivan, Office of Engineering Communications, Princeton Univ. | News | Comments

Anyone who has ever had a glass of fizzy soda knows that bubbles can throw tiny particles into the air. But in a finding with wide industrial applications, Princeton Univ. researchers have demonstrated that the bursting bubbles push some particles down into the liquid as well.

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NMR using Earth’s magnetic field

August 20, 2014 8:19 am | by Rachel Berkowitz, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory | News | Comments

Earth’s magnetic field, a familiar directional indicator over long distances, is routinely probed in applications ranging from geology to archaeology. Now it has provided the basis for a technique which might, one day, be used to characterize the chemical composition of fluid mixtures in their native environments.

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Solar energy that doesn’t block the view

August 20, 2014 8:05 am | by Tom Oswald, Media Communications, Michigan State Univ. | News | Comments

A team of researchers at Michigan State Univ. has developed a new type of solar concentrator that when placed over a window creates solar energy while allowing people to actually see through the window. It is called a transparent luminescent solar concentrator and can be used on buildings, cell phones and any other device that has a clear surface.

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Biomarker in aggressive breast cancer identified

August 20, 2014 7:53 am | by Megan Fellman, Northwestern Univ. | News | Comments

Two Northwestern Univ. scientists have identified a biomarker strongly associated with basal-like breast cancer, a highly aggressive carcinoma that is resistant to many types of chemotherapy. The biomarker, a protein called STAT3, provides a smart target for new therapeutics designed to treat this often deadly cancer.

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