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A GPS from the chemistry set

October 27, 2014 12:48 pm | News | Comments

Scientists in Europe have developed a chemical “processor” which reliably shows the fastest way through a city maze. Because the method is basically faster than a satellite navigation system, it could be useful in transport planning and logistics in the future, for instance.

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Emergent behavior lets bubbles “sense” environment

October 27, 2014 12:46 pm | Videos | Comments

Tiny, soapy bubbles can reorganize their membranes to let material flow in and out in response to the surrounding environment, according to new research. This behavior could be exploited in creating microbubbles that deliver drugs or other payloads inside the body, and could help us understand how the very first living cells on Earth might have survived billions of years ago.

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New evidence for exotic, predicted superconducting state

October 27, 2014 12:35 pm | News | Comments

A research team led by a Brown Univ. physicist has produced new evidence for an exotic superconducting state, first predicted a half-century ago, that can arise when a superconductor is exposed to a strong magnetic field. This new understanding of what happens when electron spin populations become unequal could have implications beyond superconductivity.

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Laboratory Analyzer

October 27, 2014 10:55 am | Product Releases | Comments

Analytical Systems Keco has developed an analyzer that analytically quantifies H2S in liquids such as crude oil, fuel oil, naphtha, water, marine diesel, gasoline and other liquids. The Sample Transfer Stripper (STS), ASI membrane technologies and ratiometric colorimetric technology are what gives the Model 205L the enhanced ability to quantify H2S in liquids.

Next-generation Sequencing Library Sample Preparation Kits

October 27, 2014 10:48 am | Product Releases | Comments

AMSBIO has introduced RapidSeq, library sample preparation kits for next-generation sequencing (NGS) research and diagnostic work. The RapidSeq Small RNA sample prep kit is optimized for preparation of NGS libraries for subsequent cluster generation, using purified mRNA or total RNA which contains small RNA fragments as input.

How microbes build a powerful antibiotic

October 27, 2014 10:32 am | by Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign | News | Comments

Researchers report in Nature that they have made a breakthrough in understanding how a powerful antibiotic agent is made in nature. Their discovery solves a decades-old mystery, and opens up new avenues of research into thousands of similar molecules, many of which are likely to be medically useful. 

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Remote Monitoring and Diagnostics to Improve ROI

October 27, 2014 10:19 am | by Andy Wight, Director, Service Product Portfolio, Global Services, AB Sciex | Articles | Comments

As a laboratory technician or director, knowing the current status of your instrument or sample runs is critical for your laboratory’s operations and productivity. Through the rapid increase in machine-to-machine connectivity, real-time instrument monitoring services designed to offer visibility and remote control of these instruments has become an enabler in cost savings, efficiency gains, revenue opportunities and competitive advantage.

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Fraunhofer develops economical process for micro energy harvesting

October 27, 2014 9:52 am | News | Comments

The trend toward energy self-sufficient probes and ever smaller mobile electronics systems continues, and are used to monitor the status of the engines on airplanes, or for medical implants. They gather the energy they need for this from their immediate environment, such as vibrations. Fraunhofer Institute researchers have developed a process for the economical production of piezoelectric materials that supply this type of energy.

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NASA identifies ice cloud above cruising altitude on Titan

October 27, 2014 9:34 am | News | Comments

Scientists have identified an unexpected high-altitude methane ice cloud on Saturn's moon Titan that is similar to exotic clouds found far above Earth's poles. Now, eight years after spotting this mysterious bit of atmospheric fluff, NASA's Cassini spacecraft, researchers have determined that it contains methane ice, which produces a much denser cloud than the ethane ice previously identified there.

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New dent in HIV-1’s armor

October 27, 2014 8:01 am | by The Salk Institute | Videos | Comments

Like a slumbering dragon, HIV can lay dormant in a person’s cells for years, evading medical treatments only to wake up and strike at a later time, quickly replicating itself and destroying the immune system. Scientists at the Salk Institute have uncovered a new protein that participates in active HIV replication. The new protein, called Ssu72, is part of a switch used to awaken HIV-1 from its slumber.

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How to pick a college? Data crunchers hope to help

October 27, 2014 7:54 am | by Anne Flaherty, Associated Press | News | Comments

For many high school seniors, fall means deciding where to apply for college and maybe visiting a guidance counselor. Data crunchers hope to help. The popularity of social media sites and advancements in the ability to analyze the vast amounts of data we put online give members of the class of 2015 more tools than ever to help chart their next step, even if finding the right college is an inexact science.

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New hope in treating African sleeping sickness

October 27, 2014 7:53 am | by Joe O'Connell, Staff Writer, Northeastern Univ. | News | Comments

In early drug dis­covery, you need a starting point. In a new research paper pub­lished in PLOS-Neglected Trop­ical Dis­eases, a team of researchers present hun­dreds of such starting points for poten­tially treating Human African try­panoso­mi­asis, or sleeping sick­ness, a deadly dis­ease that affects thou­sands of people annually.

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Google exec sets records with leap from near-space

October 27, 2014 7:49 am | News | Comments

Google executive Alan Eustace broke the sound barrier and set several skydiving records over the southern New Mexico desert early Friday after taking a big leap from the edge of space. Eustace's supersonic jump was part of a project by Paragon Space Development Corp., which has been working secretly for years to develop a self-contained commercial spacesuit that would allow people to explore some 20 miles above the Earth's surface.

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Turning loss to gain

October 27, 2014 7:42 am | by Steven Schultz, Princeton Univ. | News | Comments

Lasers are so deeply integrated into modern technology that their basic operations would seem well understood. CD players, medical diagnostics and military surveillance all depend on lasers. Re-examining longstanding beliefs about the physics of these devices, Princeton Univ. engineers have now shown that carefully restricting the delivery of power to certain areas within a laser could boost its output by many orders of magnitude.

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Governors back home quarantine for Ebola workers

October 27, 2014 3:28 am | by Frank Eltman - Associated Press - Associated Press | News | Comments

The governors of New York and New Jersey are at odds with scientists over Ebola as they back 21-day quarantines for medical workers returning from West Africa, while the nation's top infectious-disease expert warns that such restrictions are unnecessary and could discourage volunteers from aiding disease-ravaged countries.

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