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By focusing lasers onto silicon buried under a clear layer of silicon dioxide, the group has perfected a way to reliably blast tiny cavities in the solid silicon. This creates extremely high pressure around the explosion site and forms the new phases.

Making new materials with micro-explosions

June 30, 2015 10:49 am | by Australian National University | News | Comments

Scientists have made exotic new materials by creating laser-induced micro-explosions in silicon, the common computer chip material. The new technique could lead to the simple creation and manufacture of superconductors or high-efficiency solar cells and light sensors. By focusing lasers onto silicon buried under a clear layer of silicon dioxide, the group has perfected a way to reliably blast tiny cavities in the solid silicon.

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Computer simulations are layered over a picture of a time trial rider. Riders can save around six seconds if the team car maintains a gap of five meters, instead of the 10 meters laid down by the regulations. Courtesy of Eindhoven University of Technology

Aerodynamic effects can save tens of seconds in cycling time trials

June 30, 2015 10:35 am | by Eindhoven University of Technology | News | Comments

Will next Saturday’s Tour de France prologue get the winner it deserves? New aerodynamic research shows that riders in a time trial can save vital seconds by riding closer to the following team car. Over a short distance like the prologue of the Tour de France, that can save as much as six seconds: enough to make the difference between winning and losing. On longer events like world championships, the effect can add up to tens of seconds.

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Rice University has installed microscopes that will allow researchers to peer deeper than ever into the fabric of the universe. The Titan Themis scanning/transmission electron microscope, one of the most powerful in the United States, will enable scientis

New electron microscopes will capture images at subnanometer resolution

June 30, 2015 10:15 am | by Rice University | News | Comments

Rice University has installed microscopes that will allow researchers to peer deeper than ever into the fabric of the universe. The Titan Themis scanning/transmission electron microscope, one of the most powerful in the United States, will enable scientists from Rice as well as academic and industrial partners to view and analyze materials smaller than a nanometer — a billionth of a meter — with startling clarity.

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New method of quantum entanglement vastly increases how much information can be carried in a photon

June 30, 2015 8:51 am | by UCLA | News | Comments

A team of researchers led by UCLA electrical engineers has demonstrated a new way to harness light particles, or photons, that are connected to each other and act in unison no matter how far apart they are  — a phenomenon known as quantum entanglement.

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Graphene flexes its electronic muscles

June 30, 2015 8:47 am | by Mike Williams, Rice University | News | Comments

Flexing graphene may be the most basic way to control its electrical properties, according to calculations by theoretical physicists at Rice University and in Russia.

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Startup brings nonstick coating to consumer goods packaging

June 30, 2015 8:44 am | by Rob Matheson, MIT News Office | News | Comments

The days of wasting condiments — and other products — that stick stubbornly to the sides of their bottles may be gone, thanks to MIT spinout LiquiGlide, which has licensed its nonstick coating to a major consumer-goods company.  

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New nanogenerator harvests power from rolling tires

June 30, 2015 8:40 am | by University of Wisconsin-Madison | News | Comments

A group of University of Wisconsin-Madison engineers and a collaborator from China have developed a nanogenerator that harvests energy from a car's rolling tire friction.

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Physicists shatter stubborn mystery of how glass forms

June 30, 2015 8:37 am | by University of Waterloo | News | Comments

A physicist at the University of Waterloo is among a team of scientists who have described how glasses form at the molecular level and provided a possible solution to a problem that has stumped scientists for decades.

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Sandia's Z machine receives funding aimed at fusion energy

June 30, 2015 8:35 am | by DOE, Sandia National Laboratories | News | Comments

A two-year, $3.8 million award has been received by Sandia National Laboratories and the University of Rochester's Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE) to hasten the day of low-cost, high-yield fusion reactions for energy purposes.

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Emergency Safety Shower Decontamination Booth

June 29, 2015 4:16 pm | by HEMCO Corporation | Hemco Corporation | Product Releases | Comments

HEMCO emergency shower/decontamination booths are fully assembled and ready for installation to water supply and waste systems. The shower is molded in a one piece seamless chemical resistant fiberglass and is equipped with a pull rod-activated shower and push handle eye/face wash for immediately drenching of personnel that have been exposed to hazardous chemicals.

Model of 3-D building photographed from inside. Courtesy of Johan Gunséus

Sweden starts a project of 3D printing houses

June 29, 2015 11:42 am | by Umeå universitet | News | Comments

In a collaborative project worth SEK 35 million, researchers and external partners are together developing a technology to make full-scale 3-D prints of cellulose based material. It is not a matter of small prints—the objective is to make houses. One of the sub-goals is to produce cellulose-based materials for full-scale 3D printing, which can be anything from printing weather-stripping and doors to walls and, in the end, complete houses.

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Multi-color optical image around the ULX "X-1" (indicated by the arrow) in the dwarf galaxy Holmberg II, located in the direction of the constellation Ursa Major, at a distance of 11 million light-years. The image size corresponds to 1,100 × 900 light-yea

Unexpectedly small black-hole monsters rapidly suck up surrounding matter

June 29, 2015 11:10 am | by Subaru Telescope | News | Comments

Using the Subaru Telescope, researchers have found evidence that enigmatic objects in nearby galaxies—called ultra-luminous X-ray sources—exhibit strong outflows created as matter falls onto their black holes at unexpectedly high rates. The strong outflows suggest that black holes in these ULXs must be much smaller than expected. Curiously, these objects appear to be "cousins" of one of the most exotic objects in our own Milky Way Galaxy.

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Dr. Sahmaran tests the performance of healed ECC specimen under mechanical loading.

Concrete cracks heal themselves

June 29, 2015 10:46 am | by American Concrete Institute (ACI) | News | Comments

In the human body, small wounds are easily treated by the body itself, requiring no further care. For bigger wounds to be healed, the body may need outside assistance. Concrete is like a living body, in that it can self-heal its own small wounds (cracks) as an intrinsic characteristic. However, cracks do not heal easily in conventional concrete due to its rather brittle nature...

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To a stunned Graphene Week 2015 audience, Robert Roelver of Stuttgart-based engineering firm Bosch reported that company researchers, together with scientists at the Max-Planck Institute for Solid State Research, have created a graphene-based magnetic sen

Bosch announces breakthrough in graphene sensor technology

June 29, 2015 10:35 am | by Francis Sedgemore, Graphene Flagship | News | Comments

Graphene Week 2015 was awash with outstanding research results, but one presentation created quite a stir. To a stunned audience, Robert Roelver of Stuttgart-based engineering firm Bosch reported that company researchers, together with scientists at the Max-Planck Institute for Solid State Research, have created a graphene-based magnetic sensor 100 times more sensitive than an equivalent device based on silicon.

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The same plastic as in garbage bags makes an efficient heat exchanger in power plants by creating microchannels. Courtesy of Joshua Pearce

Better heat exchangers using garbage bags

June 29, 2015 10:21 am | by Michigan Technological University | News | Comments

The plastic used to make garbage bags also makes a good base for building low-temperature heat exchangers. Joshua Pearce's team helped design and make the plastic-based heat exchangers to be used in power plants. The key is expanded microchannel structures...

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