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Big black holes can block new stars

October 21, 2014 10:46 am | by Dennis O'Shea, Johns Hopkins Univ. | News | Comments

Massive black holes spewing out radio frequency-emitting particles at near-light speed can block formation of new stars in aging galaxies, a study has found. The research provides crucial new evidence that it is these jets of radio frequency feedback streaming from mature galaxies’ central black holes that prevent hot free gas from cooling and collapsing into baby stars.

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If CD8 T cells take on one virus, they’ll fight others too

October 21, 2014 10:36 am | by David Orenstein, Brown Univ. | News | Comments

Scientists think of CD8 T cells as long-lived cells that become tuned to fight just one pathogen, but a new study finds that once CD8 T cells fight one pathogen, they also join the body’s “innate” immune system, ready to answer the calls of the cytokine signals that are set off by a wide variety of infections.

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Orbitrap-based Mass Spectrometer

October 21, 2014 10:27 am | Thermo Fisher Scientific | Product Releases | Comments

Thermo Fisher Scientific has introduced the Thermo Scientific Q Exactive Focus LC-MS/MS, a high-resolution accurate-mass (HRAM) Orbitrap mass spectrometer. The Q Exactive Focus benchtop LC-MS/MS combines high-performance quadrupole precursor ion selection with an HRAM Orbitrap mass analyzer, providing excellent mass accuracy, sensitivity and fast polarity switching.

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PCR Assays

October 21, 2014 10:21 am | Bio-Rad Laboratories | Product Releases | Comments

Bio-Rad Laboratories Inc. has introduced the PrimePCR Assays for Droplet Digital PCR (ddPCR). The release expands Bio-Rad’s current offering of pre-designed and fully wet-laboratory validated assays by an additional 100 assays for copy number variation (CNV) and 92 assays for mutation detection. Bio-Rad will also be adding 5,620 mutation detection assays that were created using the same algorithms and design rules as the wet-laboratory validated assays.

Physicists build reversible tractor beam

October 21, 2014 9:45 am | News | Comments

Laser physicists in Australia have built a tractor beam that can repel and attract objects, using a hollow laser beam that is bright around the edges and dark in its center. It is the first long-distance optical tractor beam and has moved particles one-fifth of a millimeter in diameter a distance of up to 20 cm, around 100 times further than previous experiments.

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Puzzling new behavior found in high-temperature superconductors

October 21, 2014 9:11 am | by SLAC Office of Communications | News | Comments

Research by an international team of scientists has uncovered a new, unpredicted behavior in a copper oxide material that becomes superconducting at relatively high temperatures. This new phenomenon presents a challenge to scientists seeking to understand its origin and connection with high-temperature superconductivity. Their ultimate goal is to design a superconducting material that works at room temperature.

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Restoring order: A spin Hall effect without the fuss

October 21, 2014 9:09 am | by S. Kelley, Joint Quantum Institute | News | Comments

Joint Quantum Institute scientists have been developing a model for what happens when ultracold atomic spins are trapped in an optical lattice structure with a “double-valley” feature, where the repeating unit resembles the letter “W”. This new theory result opens up a novel path for generating what’s known as the spin Hall effect, an important example of spin-transport.

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Supercomputers link proteins to drug side effects

October 21, 2014 8:48 am | by Kenneth Ma, LLNL | News | Comments

New medications created by pharmaceutical companies have helped millions of Americans alleviate pain and suffering from their medical conditions. However, the drug creation process often misses many side effects that kill at least 100,000 patients a year, according to Nature.

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Sweeping air devices for greener planes

October 21, 2014 8:36 am | News | Comments

The large amount of jet fuel required to fly an airplane from point A to point B can have negative impacts on the environment and a traveler's wallet. With funding from NASA and the Boeing Company, engineers from Caltech and the Univ. of Arizona have developed a device that lets planes fly with much smaller tails, reducing the planes' overall size and weight, thus increasing fuel efficiency.

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Starfish shell-mimicking crystals could advance 3-D printing pills

October 21, 2014 8:19 am | by Nicole Casal Moore, Univ. of Michigan | News | Comments

In a design that mimics a hard-to-duplicate texture of starfish shells, Univ. of Michigan engineers have made rounded crystals that have no facets. The team calls the crystals "nanolobes". The nanolobes' shape and the way they're made have promising applications. The geometry could potentially be useful to guide light in advanced LEDs, solar cells and non-reflective surfaces.

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High blood-sugar levels may harden heart valves

October 21, 2014 8:05 am | by Mike Williams, Rice Univ. | News | Comments

Rice Univ. bioengineers have found new evidence of a possible link between diabetes and the hardening of heart valves. A Rice laboratory, in collaboration with the Univ. of Texas Health Science Center at Houston Medical School, discovered that the interstitial cells that turn raw materials into heart valves need just the right amount of nutrients for proper metabolic function.

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Getting the salt out

October 21, 2014 7:54 am | by David L. Chandler, MIT News Office | News | Comments

The boom in oil and gas produced through hydraulic fracturing, or fracking, is seen as a boon for meeting U.S. energy needs. But one byproduct of the process is millions of gallons of water that’s much saltier than seawater, after leaching salts from rocks deep below the surface. Now researchers at Massachusetts Institute of Technology and in Saudi Arabia say they have found an economical solution for removing the salt from this water.

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World record in data transmission with smart circuits

October 21, 2014 7:39 am | News | Comments

Fewer cords, smaller antennas and quicker video transmission. This may be the result of a new type of microwave circuit that was designed at Chalmers Univ. of Technology. The research team behind the circuits currently holds an attention-grabbing record: 40 Gbps, about twice as fast as the previous record at 140 GHz. The results will be presented at a conference this week in San Diego.

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CDC releases revised Ebola gear guidelines

October 20, 2014 11:29 pm | by Mike Stobbe - Associated Press - Associated Press | News | Comments

Federal health officials on Monday issued new guidelines to promote head-to-toe protection for health workers treating Ebola patients. Officials have been scrambling to come up with new advice for protective gear since two Dallas nurses became infected while caring for the first person diagnosed with the virus in the U.S.

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When emotions control objects

October 20, 2014 11:51 am | by Cécilia Carron, EPFL | Videos | Comments

Sensors developed by SmartCardia, a spin-off from EPFL in Switzerland, use various biological vital signs to transmit data to a host of everyday objects. This data, which includes heart rate, respiration activity, skin conductivity and physical exertion, can be used dim a light, control immersive playing on a computer, and track yoga exercises in real time.

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