Advertisement
Technologies & Strategies That Enable R&D
Subscribe to R&D Magazine All
View Sample

FREE Email Newsletter

R&D Daily

Discovering a new stage in the galactic lifecycle

June 25, 2015 12:30 pm | by Jessica Stoller-Conrad, Caltech | News | Comments

On its own, dust seems fairly unremarkable. However, by observing the clouds of gas and dust within a galaxy, astronomers can determine important information about the history of star formation and the evolution of galaxies. Now, a Caltech-led team has been able to observe the dust contents of galaxies as seen just 1 billion years after the Big Bang.

TOPICS:

A new means to killing harmful bacteria

June 25, 2015 11:50 am | by Helen Knight, MIT News correspondent | News | Comments

The global rise in antibiotic resistance is a growing threat to public health, damaging our ability to fight deadly infections such as tuberculosis. What’s more, efforts to develop new antibiotics are not keeping pace with this growth in microbial resistance, resulting in a pressing need for new approaches to tackle bacterial infection.

TOPICS:

Pointing the way to crack-resistant metals

June 25, 2015 11:20 am | by Joe Kullman, Arizona State Univ. | News | Comments

Potential solutions to big problems continue to arise from research that is revealing how materials behave at the smallest scales. The results of a new study to understand the interactions of various metal alloys at the nanometer and atomic scales are likely to aid advances in methods of preventing the failure of systems critical to public and industrial infrastructure.

TOPICS:
Advertisement

New conductive ink for electronic apparel

June 25, 2015 10:45 am | by Univ. of Tokyo | News | Comments

Univ. of Tokyo researchers have developed a new ink that can be printed on textiles in a single step to form highly conductive and stretchable connections. This new functional ink will enable electronic apparel such as sportswear and underwear incorporating sensing devices for measuring a range of biological indicators such as heart rate and muscle contraction.

TOPICS:

Science Connect: Water Shortage, Reuse is a Social Problem

June 25, 2015 7:31 am | by Michelle Taylor, Editor-in-Chief, Laboratory Equipment and Jon Dipierro, Multimedia Production | Videos | Comments

In this one-minute video, hear from an expert in water sustainability regarding the economic and social challenges of water purification and reuse. Are these challenges holding back the potential of modern water technology?

TOPICS:

Re-energizing antibiotics in the war against infections

June 24, 2015 5:00 pm | by Kat J. McAlpine, Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering | Videos | Comments

Antibiotics are the mainstay in the treatment of bacterial infections, and together with vaccines, have enabled the near eradication of infectious diseases in developed countries. However, the overuse of antibiotics has also led to an alarming rise in resistant bacteria that can outsmart antibiotics using different mechanisms. Some pathogenic bacteria are thus becoming almost untreatable.

TOPICS:

High-Flow Dual Head Pumps

June 24, 2015 4:40 pm | by Scientific Systems Inc. (SSI) | Product Releases | Comments

The Scientific Systems Inc. (SSI) rugged PR Class consists of dual-headed, positive displacement piston pumps that provide high, accurate flows and excellent pressure capability for a variety of uses. The pumps are designed for a wide range of preparative and semi-preparative chromatography, SMBC (simulated moving bed chromatography) and many process and industrial applications.

Unlocking fermentation secrets opens the door to new biofuels

June 24, 2015 4:30 pm | by Rick Kubetz, Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign | News | Comments

Researchers from the Univ. of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have, for the first time, uncovered the complex interdependence and orchestration of metabolic reactions, gene regulation and environmental cues of clostridial metabolism, providing new insights for advanced biofuel development.

TOPICS:
Advertisement

Spintronics advance brings wafer-scale quantum devices closer to reality

June 24, 2015 4:00 pm | by Carla Reiter, Univ. of Chicago | News | Comments

An electronics technology that uses the "spin" of atomic nuclei to store and process information promises huge gains in performance over today's electron-based devices. But getting there is proving challenging. Now researchers at the Univ. of Chicago's Institute for Molecular Engineering have made a crucial step toward nuclear spintronic technologies.

TOPICS:

Silica “spiky screws” could enhance industrial coatings, additive manufacturing

June 24, 2015 3:30 pm | by Heidi Hill, Oak Ridge National Laboratory | News | Comments

It took marine sponges millions of years to perfect their spike-like structures, but research mimicking these formations may soon alter how industrial coatings and 3-D printed to additively manufactured objects are produced. A new molecular paves the way for improved silica structure design by introducing microscopic, segmented screw-like spikes that can more effectively bond materials for commercial use.

TOPICS:

Study: Weather patterns that bring heatwaves happening more

June 24, 2015 2:06 pm | by Seth Borenstein, AP Science Writer, Associated Press | News | Comments

Daily weather patterns have changed in recent decades, making eastern North America, Europe and western Asia more prone to nastier summer heatwaves that go beyond global warming, a new study finds. A team of climate scientists at Stanford Univ. looked at weather patterns since 1979 and found changes in frequency and strength in parts of the world.

TOPICS:

Pinpointing the Onset of Metastasis

June 24, 2015 1:43 pm | by Lindsay Hock, Editor | Articles | Comments

Within the oncology community, a debate is raging about two controversial topics. The first is overdiagnosis. According to a recent report in The Wall Street Journal, some leading cancer experts say that zealous screening is finding ever-smaller abnormalities that are being labeled cancer or precancer with little or no justification.

TOPICS:

Nanowires could be the LEDs of the future

June 24, 2015 1:30 pm | by Univ. of Copenhagen | News | Comments

The latest research from the Niels Bohr Institute shows that LEDs made from nanowires will use less energy and provide better light. The researchers studied nanowires using x-ray microscopy and with this method they can pinpoint exactly how the nanowire should be designed to give the best properties.

TOPICS:

World’s first full-color, flexible, skin-like display

June 24, 2015 12:30 pm | by Univ. of Central Florida | News | Comments

Imagine a soldier who can change the color and pattern of his camouflage uniform from woodland green to desert tan at will. Or an office worker who could do the same with his necktie. Is someone at the wedding reception wearing the same dress as you? No problem—switch yours to a different color in the blink of an eye.

TOPICS:

New lenses grown layer-by-layer increase x-ray power

June 24, 2015 12:00 pm | by Justin Eure, Brookhaven National Laboratory | News | Comments

When you're working with the brightest x-ray light source in the world, it's crucial that you make use of as many of the photons produced as possible. That's why physicists at the National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II) are developing new lenses that focus x-ray beams to smaller spot sizes made up of more photons for better imaging resolution.

TOPICS:

Pages

X
You may login with either your assigned username or your e-mail address.
The password field is case sensitive.
Loading