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Pain in a dish

November 25, 2014 9:11 am | by Harvard Stem Cell Institute | News | Comments

After more than six years of intensive effort, and repeated failures that made the quest at times seem futile, Harvard Stem Cell Institute researchers at Boston Children’s Hospital and Harvard’s Dept. of Stem Cell and Regenerative Biology have successfully converted mouse and human skin cells into pain-sensing neurons that respond to a number of stimuli that cause acute and inflammatory pain.

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Engineers climb walls using gecko-inspired climbing device

November 25, 2014 8:54 am | by Bjorn Carey, Stanford News Service | Videos | Comments

If you spot someone stuck to the sheer glass side of a building on the Stanford Univ. campus, it's probably Elliot Hawkes testing his dissertation work. Hawkes, a mechanical engineering graduate student, works with a team of engineers who are developing controllable, reusable adhesive materials that, like the gecko toes that inspire the work, can form a strong bond with smooth surfaces but also release with minimal effort.

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Wireless electronic implants stop staph

November 25, 2014 8:41 am | by Kim Thurier, Tufts Univ. | News | Comments

Researchers at Tufts Univ., in collaboration with a team at the Univ. of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, have demonstrated a resorbable electronic implant that eliminated bacterial infection in mice by delivering heat to infected tissue when triggered by a remote wireless signal. The silk and magnesium devices then harmlessly dissolved in the test animals. The technique had previously been demonstrated only in vitro.

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LLNL, RAND partner to advance policy analysis through supercomputing

November 25, 2014 8:15 am | by Anne M. Stark, Lawrence Livermore National Laboraotry | News | Comments

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and the RAND Corporation will collaborate to expand the use of high-performance computing in decision analysis and policymaking. The two organizations signed a memorandum of understanding on Friday, Nov. 21. The arrangement provides a vehicle for the two organizations to explore the use of policy analysis methodologies with supercomputing applications.

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Improving technology used in digital memory

November 25, 2014 7:48 am | by Scott Schrage, University Communications, Univ. of Nebraska-Lincoln | News | Comments

The improvements in random access memory (RAM) that have driven many advances of the digital age owe much to the innovative application of physics and chemistry at the atomic scale. Accordingly, a team led by Univ. of Nebraska-Lincoln researchers has employed a Nobel Prize-winning material and common household chemical to enhance the properties of a component primed for the next generation of high-speed, high-capacity RAM.

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Brain’s reaction to virtual reality

November 25, 2014 7:42 am | by Stuart Wolpert, Univ. of California, Los Angeles | News | Comments

Univ. of California, Los Angeles neurophysicists have found that space-mapping neurons in the brain react differently to virtual reality than they do to real-world environments. Their findings could be significant for people who use virtual reality for gaming, military, commercial, scientific or other purposes.

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Scientists save money with DIY microscope

November 25, 2014 7:35 am | by Brunel Univ. | News | Comments

Expensive tests for measuring everything from sperm motility to cancer diagnosis have just been made cheaper by a graduate student from Brunel Univ. London who hacked his own microscope. Adam Lynch, from the university’s College of Health and Life Sciences, created his own inverted microscope by adapting a cheap instrument he bought online to save himself time and money.

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Google's latest: A spoon that steadies tremors

November 25, 2014 4:00 am | by By Martha Mendoza - AP National Writer - Associated Press | News | Comments

Just in time for the holidays, Google is throwing its money, brain power and technology at the humble spoon. Of course these spoons (don't call them spoogles) are a bit more than your basic utensil: Using hundreds of algorithms, they allow people with essential tremors and Parkinson's disease to eat without spilling.

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Unidentified country likely behind spying software

November 24, 2014 7:00 pm | by By Brandon Bailey - AP Technology Writer - Associated Press | News | Comments

Cyber-security researchers say they've identified a highly sophisticated computer hacking program that appears to have been used by an as-yet unidentified government to spy on banks, telecommunications companies, official agencies and other organizations around the world. The malicious software known as "Regin" is designed to collect data from its targets for periods of months or years.

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Cell’s skeleton is never still

November 24, 2014 11:23 am | by Mike Williams, Rice Univ. | News | Comments

New computer models that show how microtubules age are the first to match experimental results and help explain the dynamic processes behind an essential component of every living cell, according to Rice Univ. scientists. The results could help scientists fine-tune medications that manipulate microtubules to treat cancer and other diseases. 

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Terahertz device could strengthen security

November 24, 2014 11:12 am | by Northwestern Univ. | News | Comments

We are all familiar with the hassles that accompany air travel. We shuffle through long lines, remove our shoes, and carry liquids in regulation-sized tubes. And even after all the effort, we still wonder if these procedures are making us any safer. Now a new type of security detection that uses terahertz radiation is looking to prove its promise.

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Nanoparticles infiltrate, kill cancer cells from within

November 24, 2014 11:06 am | by Melanie Titanic-Schefft, Univ. of Cincinnati | News | Comments

Conventional treatment seeks to eradicate cancer cells by drugs and therapy delivered from outside the cell, which may also affect (and potentially harm) nearby normal cells. In contrast to conventional cancer therapy, a Univ. of Cincinnati team has developed several novel designs for iron-oxide based nanoparticles that detect, diagnose and destroy cancer cells using photo-thermal therapy (PTT).

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Scientists do glass a solid

November 24, 2014 10:52 am | by New York Univ. | News | Comments

How does glass transition from a liquid to its familiar solid state? How does this common material transport heat and sound? And what microscopic changes occur when a glass gains rigidity as it cools? A team of researchers at New York Univ.'s Center for Soft Matter Research offers a theoretical explanation for these processes in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

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SIMS Surface Analyzers

November 24, 2014 10:42 am | Product Releases | Comments

Secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) is a versatile, highly selective technique for compositional analysis of surfaces from the atomic level through to depths of 100s of nanometers. Hiden Analytical has extended their series of SIMS systems to offer the choice of equipment specification levels to suit a broad spread of budget capacities while maintain the potential to subsequently expand to the top-level specification.

ULT Rack for Tissue Storage Tubes

November 24, 2014 10:34 am | Product Releases | Comments

Micronic has introduced a new ultra-low-temperature (ULT) rack for tissue tube storage. Precision manufactured in a Class 7 cleanroom production facility, the Micronic 24-2 rack accommodates 24 3-mL tissue storage tubes in an automation compatible ANSI/SLAS dimensional footprint.

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