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A new dimension for integrated circuits: 3-D nanomagnetic logic

September 30, 2014 | News | Comments

Electrical engineers in Germany have demonstrated a new kind of building block for digital integrated circuits. Their experiments show that future computer chips could be based on 3-D arrangements of nanometer-scale magnets instead of transistors. In a 3-D stack of nanomagnets, the researchers have implemented a so-called “majority” logic gate, which could serve as a programmable switch in a digital circuit.

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Pure Sine Wave Inverter System

September 30, 2014 1:58 pm | Product Releases | Comments

Schaefer Inc. has unveiled new turnkey inverter systems using its Series IT of single or three-phase switch mode inverter systems with a power range from 6 kVA to 90 kVA. These highly reliable, fully-customizable "built-to-project" dc/ac pure sine wave inverters are fully isolated, using a switch mode inverter with a rectifier at input and a transformer at the output.

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Particle Size Imaging Accessory

September 30, 2014 1:53 pm | Product Releases | Comments

At Powtech 2014, Malvern Instruments launched Hydro Sight, an imaging accessory for the Mastersizer 3000 particle size analyzer, that allows quicker and easier development and application of robust particle sizing methods. In addition, Malvern launched the Hydro SV, a new wet dispersion unit for the Mastersizer 3000.

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Adding natural uncertainty improves mathematical models

September 30, 2014 1:11 pm | News | Comments

Mathematicians from Brown Univ. have introduced a new element of uncertainty into an equation used to describe the behavior of fluid flows. Ironically, allowing uncertainty into a mathematical equation that models fluid flows makes the equation much more capable of correctly reflecting the natural world, including the formation, strength, and position of air masses and fronts in the atmosphere.

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New discovery approach accelerates identification of potential cancer treatments

September 30, 2014 9:50 am | by Laura Williams, Univ. of Michigan | News | Comments

Researchers at the Univ. of Michigan have described a new approach to discovering potential cancer treatments that requires a fraction of the time needed for more traditional methods. They used the platform to identify a novel antibody that is undergoing further investigation as a potential treatment for breast, ovarian and other cancers.

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California drought linked to climate change

September 30, 2014 9:42 am | by Ker Than, Stanford Univ. | Videos | Comments

The atmospheric conditions associated with the unprecedented drought currently afflicting California are "very likely" linked to human-caused climate change, according to Stanford Univ. scientists. The team used a combination of computer simulations and statistical techniques to show that a persistent region of high atmospheric pressure hovering over the Pacific Ocean was likely to form from modern greenhouse gas concentrations.

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Glaciers in the Grand Canyon of Mars?

September 30, 2014 8:56 am | News | Comments

For decades, planetary geologists have speculated that glaciers might once have crept through Valles Marineris, the 2000-mile-long chasm that constitutes the Grand Canyon of Mars. A research team has now identified what could be the first mineralogical evidence of past glaciers within the Valles Marineris: a layer of mixed sulfate minerals halfway up three-mile-high cliffs in the canyon system.

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Research suggests new strategies for fighting TB

September 30, 2014 8:22 am | by Kevin Stacey, Brown Univ. | News | Comments

Over the past few years, a class of compounds called ADEPs (cyclic acyldepsipeptides) has emerged as a promising new weapon in the fight against drug-resistant bacteria. The compounds work by attaching themselves to a cellular enzyme called ClpP, which bacterial cells use to rid themselves of harmful proteins. With an ADEP attached, ClpP can’t function properly, and the bacterial cell dies.

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Wildlife populations plummet for 3,000 species

September 30, 2014 8:19 am | by John Heilprin, Associated Press | News | Comments

About 3,000 species of wildlife around the world have seen their numbers plummet far worse than previously thought, according to a new study by one of the world's biggest environmental groups. The Switzerland-based WWF says improved methods of measuring populations of fish, birds, mammals, amphibians and reptiles explain the huge difference from the 28% decline between 1970 and 2008 that the group reported in 2012.

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Researchers develop transparent nanoscintillators for radiation detection

September 30, 2014 7:56 am | by Traci Peterson, Univ. of Texas at Arlington | News | Comments

A Univ. of Texas at Arlington research team says recently identified radiation detection properties of a light-emitting nanostructure built in their lab could open doors for homeland security and medical advances. In a paper to be published in Optics Letters, the team describes a new method to fabricate transparent nanoscintillators by heating nanoparticles composed of lanthanum, yttrium and oxygen until a transparent ceramic is formed.

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Fat molecules influence form, function of key photosynthesis protein

September 30, 2014 7:48 am | by Elizabeth K. Gardner, Purdue Univ. | News | Comments

A mysterious space within a protein critical to photosynthesis is filled with fat molecules that influence both the protein’s architecture and electrical properties, according to two recent studies. Researchers studied the atomic structure of, and electrical interactions within, the cytochrome bf complex, a protein complex central to the transport of electrons within membranes of a plant cell, a critical step in photosynthesis.

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High-speed drug screen

September 30, 2014 7:37 am | by Anne Trafton, MIT News Office | News | Comments

Massachusetts Institute of Technology engineers have devised a way to rapidly test hundreds of different drug-delivery vehicles in living animals, making it easier to discover promising new ways to deliver a class of drugs called biologics, which includes antibodies, peptides, RNA and DNA, to human patients.

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2nd Annual Pharma Data Analytics Conference

September 29, 2014 3:10 pm | Events

The 2nd Annual Pharma Data Analytics Conference will enable senior-level analytics professionals to improve the bottom line of their business through utilizing the potential of big data. Driven by single-track case study presentations from Pfizer, Celgene, Novartis, Merck and many others, this program will explore recent trends in the pharmaceutical environment, including the influence of analytics in the commercial space, data visualization tools and techniques and methodologies for forecasting across multiple business units.

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Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy Substrate

September 29, 2014 1:33 pm | Product Releases | Comments

Ocean Optics has introduced a new substrate for surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) applications. Using precisely controlled gold nanoparticles, Ocean Optics SERS substrates amplify very weak Raman signals by many orders of magnitude. The result is fast, repeatable SERS measurements for the identification and quantification of SERS-active analytes.

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Portable Indoor Air Quality Monitor

September 29, 2014 1:14 pm | Product Releases | Comments

The new AQ Expert from E Instruments International provides monitoring and real-time data logging for indoor air quality testing in a variety of settings, including laboratories and cleanrooms. The AQ Expert includes up to 11 parameters and detects a wide variety of gases and atmospheric characteristics.

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Scientists identify the signature of aging in the brain

September 29, 2014 12:58 pm | News | Comments

How the brain ages is still largely an open question because this organ is mostly insulated from direct contact with other systems in the body. In recent research, scientists in Israel found evidence of a unique “signature” that may be the “missing link” between cognitive decline and aging. The scientists believe that this discovery may lead, in the future, to treatments that can slow or reverse cognitive decline in older people.

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