Advertisement
Technologies & Strategies That Enable R&D
Subscribe to R&D Magazine All

The Lead

3D-printed aerogels improve energy storage

April 23, 2015 | by Anne M. Stark, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory | News | Comments

A new type of graphene aerogel will make for better energy storage, sensors, nanoelectronics, catalysis and separations. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory researchers have made graphene aerogel microlattices with an engineered architecture via a 3D printing technique known as direct ink writing.

TOPICS:
View Sample

FREE Email Newsletter

R&D Daily
Daniel Wilson Ph.D. researcher with UAV and drogue

Sky-high refuelling for UAVs

April 24, 2015 11:13 am | by Univ. of Sydney | News | Comments

A Univ. of Sydney researcher has designed and successfully tested a method for autonomously docking drones for refueling or recharging, in mid-air. He used a combination of precise measurements from an infrared camera, with GPS and inertial sensors to allow the sky-high docking to occur.

TOPICS:
JILA's strontium lattice atomic clock now performs better than ever because scientists literally "take the temperature" of the atoms' environment. Two specialized thermometers, calibrated by NIST researchers and visible in the center of the photo, are ins

Getting better all the time: JILA strontium atomic clock sets new records

April 24, 2015 10:57 am | by NIST | News | Comments

In another advance at the far frontiers of timekeeping by NIST researchers, the latest modification of a record-setting strontium atomic clock has achieved precision and stability levels that now mean the clock would neither gain nor lose one second in some 15 billion years—roughly the age of the universe.

TOPICS:
A team of researchers using the Advanced Photon Source, above, a U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science User Facility at Argonne National Laboratory, demonstrated unparalleled sensitivity for measuring the distribution of trace elements in thicker sp

X-ray ptychography, fluorescence microscopy combo sheds new light on trace elements

April 24, 2015 10:44 am | by Angela Hardin, Argonne National Laboratory | News | Comments

Scientists have developed a new approach that combines ptychographic x-ray imaging and fluorescence microscopy to study the important role trace elements play in biological functions on hydrated cells. A team of researchers using the Advanced Photon Source demonstrated unparalleled sensitivity for measuring distribution of trace elements in thicker specimens at cryogenic temperatures, in this case at about 260 degrees below Fahrenheit.

TOPICS:
Advertisement
The ‘gate sensor’ is so accurate that it can detect the charge of a single electron in less than one microsecond.

Ultra-sensitive sensor detects individual electrons

April 24, 2015 10:25 am | by SINC | News | Comments

A Spanish-led team of European researchers at the Univ. of Cambridge has created an electronic device so accurate that it can detect the charge of a single electron in less than one microsecond. It has been dubbed the "gate sensor" and could be applied in quantum computers of the future to read information stored in the charge or spin of a single electron.

TOPICS:
A tetrahedron is a polyhedron composed of four triangular faces, three of which meet at each corner or vertex. It has six edges and four vertices.

Revolutionary discovery leads to invention of new "building blocks"

April 24, 2015 10:16 am | by Univ. of Akron | News | Comments

Macromolecular science will have to add a new giant molecule to its lexicon thanks to new and cutting-edge polymer research at The Univ. of Akron (UA). The research team led by Stephen Z.D. Cheng, professor at UA’s college of polymer science and polymer engineering, invented a new thinking pathway in the design and synthesis of macromolecules—the backbone of modern polymers—by creating an original class of giant tetrahedra.

TOPICS:
James Webb Space Telescope's Pathfinder backplane test model is being prepared for its cryogenic test. Courtesy of NASA/Chris Gunn

Building Hubble's successor: Crucial Pathfinder test set up inside Chamber A

April 24, 2015 10:05 am | by Laura Betz, NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center | News | Comments

Inside NASA's giant thermal vacuum chamber, called Chamber A, at NASA's Johnson Space Center in Houston, the James Webb Space Telescope's Pathfinder backplane test model is being prepared for its cryogenic test. Previously used for manned spaceflight missions, this historic chamber is now filled with engineers and technicians preparing for a crucial test.

TOPICS:

Heat makes electrons’ spin in magnetic superconductors

April 24, 2015 9:53 am | by Academy of Finland | News | Comments

Physicists have shown how heat can be exploited for controlling magnetic properties of matter. The finding helps in the development of more efficient mass memories. The result was published in Physical Review Letters. The international research group behind the breakthrough included Finnish researchers from the University of Jyväskylä and Aalto Univ.

TOPICS:

Why Drafting Standards Play a Vital Role in Engineering Communication?

April 24, 2015 9:10 am | by Gaurang Trivedi, Engineering Consultant, TrueCADD | Articles | Comments

Engineering drawings remain at a core for any manufacturing organization as they communicate ideas that are expected to be transformed into a profitable product. Most companies begin developing engineering drawings using international drafting standards. However, with the course of time, and as the idea begins to shape up, there’s always a deviation from the standards followed.

TOPICS:
Advertisement

Real-Time Process Measurement: A Sea Change in Manufacturing

April 24, 2015 8:44 am | by Chad Lieber, VP of Product Development, Prozess Technologies and Brian Sullivan, Director of Sales, Valin Corp. | Articles | Comments

In a world where most information is available in an instant, plant managers and engineers are continuously trying to find ways to improve the efficiency of processes along the manufacturing line. Analyzing these processes can be a difficult task. Until recently, days of laboratory work were often required to analyze any given sample segment or process in a manufacturing line.

TOPICS:

Portable MRI could aid wounded soldiers in Third World

April 24, 2015 8:37 am | by Kevin Roark, Los Alamos National Laboratory | News | Comments

Scientists at Los Alamos National Laboratory are developing an ultra-low-field magnetic resonance imaging system that could be low-power and lightweight enough for forward deployment on the battlefield and to field hospitals in the world's poorest regions.

TOPICS:

Study: Photosynthesis has unique isotopic signature

April 24, 2015 8:23 am | by Jade Boyd, Rice Univ. | News | Comments

Photosynthesis leaves behind a unique calling card, a chemical signature that is spelled out with stable oxygen isotopes, according to a new study in Science. The findings suggest that similar isotopic signatures could exist for many biological processes, including some that are difficult to observe with current tools.

TOPICS:

Zeroing in on a silent killer

April 24, 2015 8:16 am | by Robert Perkins, Univ. of Southern California | News | Comments

One in three Americans has high blood pressure, a long-term constriction of arteries that can lead to coronary heart disease, heart failure and stroke. Using a sophisticated x-ray analysis, a U.S.-German team of scientists revealed the molecular structure of the angiotensin receptor AT1R, an important regulator for blood pressure in the human body.

TOPICS:

Method takes quantum sensing to a new level

April 24, 2015 8:09 am | by Ron Walli, Oak Ridge National Laboratory | News | Comments

Thermal imaging, microscopy and ultra-trace sensing could take a quantum leap with a technique developed by researchers at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Their work overcomes fundamental limitations of detection derived from the Heisenberg uncertainty principle, which states that the position and momentum of a particle cannot be measured with absolute precision.

TOPICS:

Researchers use novel polarization to increase data speeds

April 24, 2015 7:53 am | by Jay Mwamba, The City College of New York | News | Comments

As the world’s exponentially growing demand for digital data slows the Internet and cell phone communication, City College of New York researchers may have just figured out a new way to increase its speed.

TOPICS:

A silver lining

April 24, 2015 7:43 am | by Julie Cohen, Univ. of California, Santa Barbara | News | Comments

The silver used by Beth Gwinn’s research group at the Univ. of California, Santa Barbara, has value far beyond its worth as a commodity, even though it’s used in very small amounts. The group works with the precious metal to create nanoscale silver clusters with unique fluorescent properties. These properties are important for a variety of sensing applications including biomedical imaging.

TOPICS:

Pages

X
You may login with either your assigned username or your e-mail address.
The password field is case sensitive.
Loading